The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposures and health consequences

Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposures and health consequences
Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposures and health consequences
Maternal and child undernutrition is highly prevalent in low-income and middle-income countries, resulting in substantial increases in mortality and overall disease burden. In this paper, we present new analyses to estimate the effects of the risks related to measures of undernutrition, as well as to suboptimum breastfeeding practices on mortality and disease. We estimated that stunting, severe wasting, and intrauterine growth restriction together were responsible for 2.2 million deaths and 21% of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for children younger than 5 years. Deficiencies of vitamin A and zinc were estimated to be responsible for 0 . 6 million and 0 . 4 million deaths, respectively, and a combined 9 % of global childhood DALYs. Iron and iodine deficiencies resulted in few child deaths, and combined were responsible for about 0 . 2% of global childhood DALYs. Iron deficiency as a risk factor for maternal mortality added 115 000 deaths and 0.4% of global total DALYs. Suboptimum breastfeeding was estimated to be responsible for 1 . 4 million child deaths and 44 million DALYs (10% of DALYs in children younger than 5 years). In an analysis that accounted for co-exposure of these nutrition-related factors, they were together responsible for about 35% of child deaths and 11% of the total global disease burden. The high mortality and disease burden resulting from these nutrition-related factors make a compelling case for the urgent implementation of interventions to reduce their occurrence or ameliorate their consequences
controlled clinical-trial, exposure, iron supplementation, childhood, intrauterine growth, disease, randomized controlled-trials, analysis, human, risk, growth, child, iron, infant-mortality, placebo-controlled trial, vitamin-a supplementation, health, deficiency, maternal, young-children, children, developing-countries, major risk-factors, mortality, double-blind, undernutrition, review
0140-6736
243-260
Black, R. E.
6333963b-a540-4018-a964-45ffc43d8eef
Allen, L. H.
6b49d449-3858-4781-b7ac-f8a8ff7e5ae7
Bhutta, Z. A.
34a9f09e-d9b2-4b63-97c9-87a1f1b14de9
Caulfield, L. E.
e7155759-ea7e-4eec-9341-d52ee59b6731
De Onis, M.
3a5bc78d-b4b2-47db-882d-4b115b77a7be
Ezzati, M.
4dd3e394-fc66-4a28-ab9e-9c117298d33a
Mathers, C.
dacdb8ce-8cb0-4d04-b234-8679aaf33e87
Rivera, J.
a009df27-6c6b-4913-bbfd-65e1175ea8e0
Black, R. E.
6333963b-a540-4018-a964-45ffc43d8eef
Allen, L. H.
6b49d449-3858-4781-b7ac-f8a8ff7e5ae7
Bhutta, Z. A.
34a9f09e-d9b2-4b63-97c9-87a1f1b14de9
Caulfield, L. E.
e7155759-ea7e-4eec-9341-d52ee59b6731
De Onis, M.
3a5bc78d-b4b2-47db-882d-4b115b77a7be
Ezzati, M.
4dd3e394-fc66-4a28-ab9e-9c117298d33a
Mathers, C.
dacdb8ce-8cb0-4d04-b234-8679aaf33e87
Rivera, J.
a009df27-6c6b-4913-bbfd-65e1175ea8e0

Black, R. E., Allen, L. H., Bhutta, Z. A., Caulfield, L. E., De Onis, M., Ezzati, M., Mathers, C. and Rivera, J. (2008) Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposures and health consequences. The Lancet, 371 (9608), 243-260. (doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(07)61690-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Maternal and child undernutrition is highly prevalent in low-income and middle-income countries, resulting in substantial increases in mortality and overall disease burden. In this paper, we present new analyses to estimate the effects of the risks related to measures of undernutrition, as well as to suboptimum breastfeeding practices on mortality and disease. We estimated that stunting, severe wasting, and intrauterine growth restriction together were responsible for 2.2 million deaths and 21% of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for children younger than 5 years. Deficiencies of vitamin A and zinc were estimated to be responsible for 0 . 6 million and 0 . 4 million deaths, respectively, and a combined 9 % of global childhood DALYs. Iron and iodine deficiencies resulted in few child deaths, and combined were responsible for about 0 . 2% of global childhood DALYs. Iron deficiency as a risk factor for maternal mortality added 115 000 deaths and 0.4% of global total DALYs. Suboptimum breastfeeding was estimated to be responsible for 1 . 4 million child deaths and 44 million DALYs (10% of DALYs in children younger than 5 years). In an analysis that accounted for co-exposure of these nutrition-related factors, they were together responsible for about 35% of child deaths and 11% of the total global disease burden. The high mortality and disease burden resulting from these nutrition-related factors make a compelling case for the urgent implementation of interventions to reduce their occurrence or ameliorate their consequences

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2008
Keywords: controlled clinical-trial, exposure, iron supplementation, childhood, intrauterine growth, disease, randomized controlled-trials, analysis, human, risk, growth, child, iron, infant-mortality, placebo-controlled trial, vitamin-a supplementation, health, deficiency, maternal, young-children, children, developing-countries, major risk-factors, mortality, double-blind, undernutrition, review
Organisations: Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 70295
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/70295
ISSN: 0140-6736
PURE UUID: 4d13665c-12a0-420b-b528-8d0ed3366103

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jan 2010
Last modified: 05 Oct 2018 12:12

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: R. E. Black
Author: L. H. Allen
Author: Z. A. Bhutta
Author: L. E. Caulfield
Author: M. De Onis
Author: M. Ezzati
Author: C. Mathers
Author: J. Rivera

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×