The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The relationship between the fatty acid composition of immune cells and their function

The relationship between the fatty acid composition of immune cells and their function
The relationship between the fatty acid composition of immune cells and their function
The immune system, including its inflammatory components, is fundamental to host defence against pathogenic invaders. It is a complex system involving interactions amongst many different cell types dispersed throughout the body. Central to its actions are phagocytosis of bacteria, processing of antigens derived from intracellular and extracellular pathogens, activation of T cells with clonal expansion (proliferation) and production of cytokines that elicit effector cell functions such as antibody production and killing cell activity. Inappropriate immunologic activity, including inflammation, is a characteristic of many common human disorders. Eicosanoids produced from arachidonic acid have roles in inflammation and regulation of T and B lymphocyte functions. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) also gives rise to eicosanoids and these may have differing properties from those of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids. EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) give rise to newly discovered resolvins which are anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving. Human immune cells are typically rich in arachidonic acid, but arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA contents can be altered through oral administration of EPA and DHA. This results in a changed pattern of production of eicosanoids and probably also of resolvins, although the latter are not well examined in the human context. Changing the fatty acid composition of immune cells also affects phagocytosis, T cell signaling and antigen presentation capability. These effects appear to mediated at the membrane level suggesting important roles of fatty acids in membrane order, lipid raft structure and function, and membrane trafficking. Thus, the fatty acid composition of human immune cells influences their function and the cell membrane contents of arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA are important. Fatty acids influence immune cell function through a variety of complex mechanisms and these mechanisms are now beginning to be unraveled
system, eicosapentaenoic acid, fatty acid, acid, cytokines, fatty acids, eicosanoids, inflammation, activity, arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic-acid, human, nutrition
101-108
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Calder, Philip C. (2008) The relationship between the fatty acid composition of immune cells and their function. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 79 (3-5), 101-108. (doi:10.1016/j.plefa.2008.09.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The immune system, including its inflammatory components, is fundamental to host defence against pathogenic invaders. It is a complex system involving interactions amongst many different cell types dispersed throughout the body. Central to its actions are phagocytosis of bacteria, processing of antigens derived from intracellular and extracellular pathogens, activation of T cells with clonal expansion (proliferation) and production of cytokines that elicit effector cell functions such as antibody production and killing cell activity. Inappropriate immunologic activity, including inflammation, is a characteristic of many common human disorders. Eicosanoids produced from arachidonic acid have roles in inflammation and regulation of T and B lymphocyte functions. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) also gives rise to eicosanoids and these may have differing properties from those of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids. EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) give rise to newly discovered resolvins which are anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving. Human immune cells are typically rich in arachidonic acid, but arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA contents can be altered through oral administration of EPA and DHA. This results in a changed pattern of production of eicosanoids and probably also of resolvins, although the latter are not well examined in the human context. Changing the fatty acid composition of immune cells also affects phagocytosis, T cell signaling and antigen presentation capability. These effects appear to mediated at the membrane level suggesting important roles of fatty acids in membrane order, lipid raft structure and function, and membrane trafficking. Thus, the fatty acid composition of human immune cells influences their function and the cell membrane contents of arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA are important. Fatty acids influence immune cell function through a variety of complex mechanisms and these mechanisms are now beginning to be unraveled

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2008
Keywords: system, eicosapentaenoic acid, fatty acid, acid, cytokines, fatty acids, eicosanoids, inflammation, activity, arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic-acid, human, nutrition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 70322
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/70322
PURE UUID: 2e965aa7-219b-4440-89f3-940387afe9b3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Feb 2010
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 23:46

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×