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Development of an early intervention to prevent long-term incapacity for work: using an online RAND/UCLA appropriateness method to obtain the views of general practitioners

Development of an early intervention to prevent long-term incapacity for work: using an online RAND/UCLA appropriateness method to obtain the views of general practitioners
Development of an early intervention to prevent long-term incapacity for work: using an online RAND/UCLA appropriateness method to obtain the views of general practitioners
Aim: to explore the acceptability amongst general practitioners (GPs) of an early intervention to prevent long-term sickness absence from work and to identify the appropriate broad characteristics of such a service.
Background: the effect of long-term sickness absence from work on individuals and society has been the subject of recent policy debate. In the United Kingdom, a number of return-to-work interventions have been piloted and plans to reform the incapacity benefit system are underway. Since GPs play a key role in the sickness certification process, their views on the appropriateness of an early return-to-work intervention were sought to help inform the development of a primary care-based model.
Methods: a panel of nine GPs from eight practices in a mixed rural/urban area of the South West of England participated in a modified RAND/UCLA appropriateness method (RAM) study. Panellists completed two rounds of an online survey in which they were asked to read a summary of relevant research evidence and then rate the level of appropriateness of providing a return-to-work intervention in a series of clinical scenarios.
Findings: there was general support for a return-to-work intervention. Panellists considered the intervention would be more appropriate for patients with mild-moderate rather than severe symptoms and for those with longer symptom duration. There was support for early intervention after approximately seven weeks of absence from work, but not before four weeks of absence. The return-to-work intervention was considered most appropriate for patients with repeat or recurrent patterns of sickness absence, rather than those on their first sickness absence period, and for those not already receiving specialist health input for their condition. Panellists considered that a multidisciplinary team providing a combination of biopsychosocial and vocational support would be the most appropriate model, with the service possibly being located outside of a general practice setting
early intervention, primary care, RAND/UCLA appropriateness method, return to work, sickness absence, vocational rehabilitation
1463-4236
65-78
Wright, Christine
7a5b5704-5ab5-44d6-a5d5-04e106ec4c97
Moseley, Alice
0da467e1-d68e-4d9a-b20e-5b2ca73fc6b2
Chilvers, Rupatharshini
ea52d13d-3030-4841-b29c-65395253b205
Stabb, Laura
0c52d822-c54d-429d-9934-bf09315122aa
Campbell, John L.
07cffd7d-3b19-409e-aabf-46531ac4c4de
Richards, Suzanne H.
31f6cdf7-c7e4-468f-8434-77279128303b
Wright, Christine
7a5b5704-5ab5-44d6-a5d5-04e106ec4c97
Moseley, Alice
0da467e1-d68e-4d9a-b20e-5b2ca73fc6b2
Chilvers, Rupatharshini
ea52d13d-3030-4841-b29c-65395253b205
Stabb, Laura
0c52d822-c54d-429d-9934-bf09315122aa
Campbell, John L.
07cffd7d-3b19-409e-aabf-46531ac4c4de
Richards, Suzanne H.
31f6cdf7-c7e4-468f-8434-77279128303b

Wright, Christine, Moseley, Alice, Chilvers, Rupatharshini, Stabb, Laura, Campbell, John L. and Richards, Suzanne H. (2009) Development of an early intervention to prevent long-term incapacity for work: using an online RAND/UCLA appropriateness method to obtain the views of general practitioners. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 10 (1), 65-78. (doi:10.1017/S1463423608000947).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: to explore the acceptability amongst general practitioners (GPs) of an early intervention to prevent long-term sickness absence from work and to identify the appropriate broad characteristics of such a service.
Background: the effect of long-term sickness absence from work on individuals and society has been the subject of recent policy debate. In the United Kingdom, a number of return-to-work interventions have been piloted and plans to reform the incapacity benefit system are underway. Since GPs play a key role in the sickness certification process, their views on the appropriateness of an early return-to-work intervention were sought to help inform the development of a primary care-based model.
Methods: a panel of nine GPs from eight practices in a mixed rural/urban area of the South West of England participated in a modified RAND/UCLA appropriateness method (RAM) study. Panellists completed two rounds of an online survey in which they were asked to read a summary of relevant research evidence and then rate the level of appropriateness of providing a return-to-work intervention in a series of clinical scenarios.
Findings: there was general support for a return-to-work intervention. Panellists considered the intervention would be more appropriate for patients with mild-moderate rather than severe symptoms and for those with longer symptom duration. There was support for early intervention after approximately seven weeks of absence from work, but not before four weeks of absence. The return-to-work intervention was considered most appropriate for patients with repeat or recurrent patterns of sickness absence, rather than those on their first sickness absence period, and for those not already receiving specialist health input for their condition. Panellists considered that a multidisciplinary team providing a combination of biopsychosocial and vocational support would be the most appropriate model, with the service possibly being located outside of a general practice setting

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More information

Published date: January 2009
Keywords: early intervention, primary care, RAND/UCLA appropriateness method, return to work, sickness absence, vocational rehabilitation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 71211
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/71211
ISSN: 1463-4236
PURE UUID: 171f1db4-cbd5-4d8c-b1ae-cd3fa9efd175

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Date deposited: 29 Jan 2010
Last modified: 19 Jul 2017 00:01

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Contributors

Author: Christine Wright
Author: Alice Moseley
Author: Rupatharshini Chilvers
Author: Laura Stabb
Author: John L. Campbell
Author: Suzanne H. Richards

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