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Role of 4-1BB:4-1BBL in cancer immunotherapy

Role of 4-1BB:4-1BBL in cancer immunotherapy
Role of 4-1BB:4-1BBL in cancer immunotherapy
The activation of T cells plays a central role in antitumor immunity. In order to activate naïve T cells, two key signals are required. Signal one is provided through the T-cell receptor (TCR) while signal two is that of costimulation. The CD28:B7 molecules are one of the best-studied costimulatory pathways, thought to be the main mechanism through which primary T-cell stimulation occurs. However, a number of molecules have been identified which serve to amplify and diversify the T-cell response, following initial T-cell activation. These include the more recently described 4-1BB:4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) molecules. 4-1BB:4-1BBL are a member of the TNFR:TNF ligand family, which are expressed on T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), respectively. Therapies utilizing the 4-1BB:4-1BBL signaling pathway have been shown to have antitumor effects in a number of model systems. In this paper, we focus on the 4-1BB:4-1BBL costimulatory molecules. In particular, we will describe the structure and function of the 4-1BB molecule, its receptor and how 4-1BB:4-1BBL costimulation has and may be used for the immunotherapy of cancer
4-1BB, costimulatory molecules, cancer immunotherapy
0929-1903
215-226
Cheuk, Adam T.C.
fd9f3583-c275-435d-9878-ebc58eaa1d97
Mufti, Ghulam J.
940de420-bc41-4006-8517-f2c926ba70aa
Guinn, Barbara-ann
728d28c9-a23d-413a-ba1d-4531005705d7
Cheuk, Adam T.C.
fd9f3583-c275-435d-9878-ebc58eaa1d97
Mufti, Ghulam J.
940de420-bc41-4006-8517-f2c926ba70aa
Guinn, Barbara-ann
728d28c9-a23d-413a-ba1d-4531005705d7

Cheuk, Adam T.C., Mufti, Ghulam J. and Guinn, Barbara-ann (2004) Role of 4-1BB:4-1BBL in cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Gene Therapy, 11 (3), 215-226. (doi:10.1038/sj.cgt.7700670).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The activation of T cells plays a central role in antitumor immunity. In order to activate naïve T cells, two key signals are required. Signal one is provided through the T-cell receptor (TCR) while signal two is that of costimulation. The CD28:B7 molecules are one of the best-studied costimulatory pathways, thought to be the main mechanism through which primary T-cell stimulation occurs. However, a number of molecules have been identified which serve to amplify and diversify the T-cell response, following initial T-cell activation. These include the more recently described 4-1BB:4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) molecules. 4-1BB:4-1BBL are a member of the TNFR:TNF ligand family, which are expressed on T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), respectively. Therapies utilizing the 4-1BB:4-1BBL signaling pathway have been shown to have antitumor effects in a number of model systems. In this paper, we focus on the 4-1BB:4-1BBL costimulatory molecules. In particular, we will describe the structure and function of the 4-1BB molecule, its receptor and how 4-1BB:4-1BBL costimulation has and may be used for the immunotherapy of cancer

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More information

Published date: March 2004
Keywords: 4-1BB, costimulatory molecules, cancer immunotherapy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 71597
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/71597
ISSN: 0929-1903
PURE UUID: c9a88922-822d-4b42-b6b7-5ed6332be386

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Date deposited: 15 Dec 2009
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:59

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Contributors

Author: Adam T.C. Cheuk
Author: Ghulam J. Mufti
Author: Barbara-ann Guinn

University divisions

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