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Spatial and temporal variation in the abundance, distribution and population structure of epibenthic megafauna in Port Foster, Deception Island

Spatial and temporal variation in the abundance, distribution and population structure of epibenthic megafauna in Port Foster, Deception Island
Spatial and temporal variation in the abundance, distribution and population structure of epibenthic megafauna in Port Foster, Deception Island
Abundance and spatial distribution of epibenthic megafauna were examined at Port Foster, Deception Island, five times between March 1999 and November 2000. Camera sled surveys and bottom trawls were used to identify and collect specimens, and camera sled photographs also were used to determine abundances and spatial distributions for each species. The ophiuroid Ophionotus victoriae, the regular echinoid Sterechinus neumayeri, and one or more species of Porifera were the most abundant taxa during this sampling period. Abundances of O. victoriae varied throughout the annual cycle, peaking in June 2000, and were correlated positively with sedimentation rates. In contrast, abundances of S. neumayeri were consistent throughout the sampling period, except for a peak in June 2000, during austral winter. Peak abundances for both species coincided with a large number of small individuals, indicating apparent recruitment events for O. victoriae and S. neumayeri during this time period. Poriferans, as a group, had statistically similar abundances during each sampling period. Low-abundance species tended to be aggregated on both small and large spatial scales, their distributions probably influenced by reproductive method, gregarious settlement, and food availability. The spatial distribution of S. neumayeri in June 2000 and O. victoriae was random across multiple spatial scales, perhaps in response to food availability and broad environmental tolerances, respectively.
0967-0645
1821-1842
Cranmer, T.L.
97ecf9d1-c1d1-440d-a12c-dad6de01f665
Ruhl, H.A.
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Baldwin, R.J.
d138d54e-5b53-4126-8c85-e03386d8c493
Kaufmann, R.S.
63be976e-b20d-449b-aa69-c253a84366b2
Cranmer, T.L.
97ecf9d1-c1d1-440d-a12c-dad6de01f665
Ruhl, H.A.
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Baldwin, R.J.
d138d54e-5b53-4126-8c85-e03386d8c493
Kaufmann, R.S.
63be976e-b20d-449b-aa69-c253a84366b2

Cranmer, T.L., Ruhl, H.A., Baldwin, R.J. and Kaufmann, R.S. (2003) Spatial and temporal variation in the abundance, distribution and population structure of epibenthic megafauna in Port Foster, Deception Island. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 50 (10-11), 1821-1842. (doi:10.1016/S0967-0645(03)00093-6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Abundance and spatial distribution of epibenthic megafauna were examined at Port Foster, Deception Island, five times between March 1999 and November 2000. Camera sled surveys and bottom trawls were used to identify and collect specimens, and camera sled photographs also were used to determine abundances and spatial distributions for each species. The ophiuroid Ophionotus victoriae, the regular echinoid Sterechinus neumayeri, and one or more species of Porifera were the most abundant taxa during this sampling period. Abundances of O. victoriae varied throughout the annual cycle, peaking in June 2000, and were correlated positively with sedimentation rates. In contrast, abundances of S. neumayeri were consistent throughout the sampling period, except for a peak in June 2000, during austral winter. Peak abundances for both species coincided with a large number of small individuals, indicating apparent recruitment events for O. victoriae and S. neumayeri during this time period. Poriferans, as a group, had statistically similar abundances during each sampling period. Low-abundance species tended to be aggregated on both small and large spatial scales, their distributions probably influenced by reproductive method, gregarious settlement, and food availability. The spatial distribution of S. neumayeri in June 2000 and O. victoriae was random across multiple spatial scales, perhaps in response to food availability and broad environmental tolerances, respectively.

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Published date: June 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 71800
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/71800
ISSN: 0967-0645
PURE UUID: 98706768-238e-488c-b488-1c8751f81a72

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Date deposited: 23 Dec 2009
Last modified: 07 Jan 2022 23:42

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Contributors

Author: T.L. Cranmer
Author: H.A. Ruhl
Author: R.J. Baldwin
Author: R.S. Kaufmann

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