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Collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars: post black hole formation

Collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars: post black hole formation
Collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars: post black hole formation
We investigate the collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars (SMSs) by means of 3+1 hydrodynamic simulations in general relativity. We particularly focus on the onset of collapse to understand the final outcome of collapsing SMSs. We find that the estimated ratio of the mass between the black hole (BH) and the surrounding disk from the equilibrium star is roughly the same as the results from numerical simulation. This suggests that the picture of axisymmetric collapse is adequate, in the absence of nonaxisymmetric instabilities, to illustrate the final state of the collapse. We also find that quasi-periodic gravitational waves continue to be emitted after the quasinormal mode frequency has decayed. We furthermore have found that when the newly formed BH is almost extreme Kerr, the amplitude of the quasi-periodic oscillation is enhanced during the late stages of the evolution. Geometrical features, shock waves, and instabilities of the fluid are suggested as a cause of this amplification behaviour. This alternative scenario for the collapse of differentially rotating SMSs might be observable by LISA
2470-0029
064001-[17 pp]
Saijo, Motoyuki
f2128aae-e896-4290-a382-d413c868a617
Hawke, Ian
fc964672-c794-4260-a972-eaf818e7c9f4
Saijo, Motoyuki
f2128aae-e896-4290-a382-d413c868a617
Hawke, Ian
fc964672-c794-4260-a972-eaf818e7c9f4

Saijo, Motoyuki and Hawke, Ian (2009) Collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars: post black hole formation. Physical Review D, 80, 064001-[17 pp]. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.80.064001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We investigate the collapse of differentially rotating supermassive stars (SMSs) by means of 3+1 hydrodynamic simulations in general relativity. We particularly focus on the onset of collapse to understand the final outcome of collapsing SMSs. We find that the estimated ratio of the mass between the black hole (BH) and the surrounding disk from the equilibrium star is roughly the same as the results from numerical simulation. This suggests that the picture of axisymmetric collapse is adequate, in the absence of nonaxisymmetric instabilities, to illustrate the final state of the collapse. We also find that quasi-periodic gravitational waves continue to be emitted after the quasinormal mode frequency has decayed. We furthermore have found that when the newly formed BH is almost extreme Kerr, the amplitude of the quasi-periodic oscillation is enhanced during the late stages of the evolution. Geometrical features, shock waves, and instabilities of the fluid are suggested as a cause of this amplification behaviour. This alternative scenario for the collapse of differentially rotating SMSs might be observable by LISA

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More information

Submitted date: 27 May 2009
Published date: 1 September 2009
Organisations: Applied Mathematics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 71933
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/71933
ISSN: 2470-0029
PURE UUID: 9ad34228-4720-479c-bd89-d5f79ac8d9a2
ORCID for Ian Hawke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4805-0309

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jan 2010
Last modified: 28 Jun 2022 01:41

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Contributors

Author: Motoyuki Saijo
Author: Ian Hawke ORCID iD

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