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Testing planktic foraminiferal shell weight as a surface water [CO32?] proxy using plankton net samples

Testing planktic foraminiferal shell weight as a surface water [CO32?] proxy using plankton net samples
Testing planktic foraminiferal shell weight as a surface water [CO32?] proxy using plankton net samples
Planktic foraminiferal size-normalized weight (SNW) has been used as a proxy for both past changes in deepwater dissolution and surface ocean [CO32?], the latter potentially providing a way to evaluate paleoatmospheric pCO2 variations beyond the ice core records. Here we examine the relationship between SNW in modern planktic foraminifera and surface water [CO32?] in the Arabian Sea using a suite of samples obtained from plankton net casts in surface waters having a large range in their carbon chemistry. Our results reveal substantial interspecies- and intraspecies-specific variations in the strength, gradient, and even sign of this relationship, indicating that [CO32?] does not exert a dominant control on foraminiferal test weight. Similarly, foraminiferal abundance data do not lend support to the hypothesis that SNW responds to optimal growth conditions. Further work is needed, perhaps in laboratory cultures, to determine those environmental factors that are simply correlated with SNW and those that exert control.
0091-7613
103-106
Beer, Christopher J.
099ccf7a-6bad-479b-a298-5a7fe7d64229
Schiebel, Ralf
5c48accb-ee14-471a-801f-4267d8e4b2e1
Wilson, Paul A.
f940a9f0-fa5a-4a64-9061-f0794bfbf7c6
Beer, Christopher J.
099ccf7a-6bad-479b-a298-5a7fe7d64229
Schiebel, Ralf
5c48accb-ee14-471a-801f-4267d8e4b2e1
Wilson, Paul A.
f940a9f0-fa5a-4a64-9061-f0794bfbf7c6

Beer, Christopher J., Schiebel, Ralf and Wilson, Paul A. (2010) Testing planktic foraminiferal shell weight as a surface water [CO32?] proxy using plankton net samples. Geology, 38 (2), 103-106. (doi:10.1130/G30150.1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Planktic foraminiferal size-normalized weight (SNW) has been used as a proxy for both past changes in deepwater dissolution and surface ocean [CO32?], the latter potentially providing a way to evaluate paleoatmospheric pCO2 variations beyond the ice core records. Here we examine the relationship between SNW in modern planktic foraminifera and surface water [CO32?] in the Arabian Sea using a suite of samples obtained from plankton net casts in surface waters having a large range in their carbon chemistry. Our results reveal substantial interspecies- and intraspecies-specific variations in the strength, gradient, and even sign of this relationship, indicating that [CO32?] does not exert a dominant control on foraminiferal test weight. Similarly, foraminiferal abundance data do not lend support to the hypothesis that SNW responds to optimal growth conditions. Further work is needed, perhaps in laboratory cultures, to determine those environmental factors that are simply correlated with SNW and those that exert control.

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Published date: February 2010

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 72555
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72555
ISSN: 0091-7613
PURE UUID: 516fb56d-f40b-4791-afa5-7549f57c4330

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Date deposited: 17 Feb 2010
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 23:43

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