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Occupational deprivation and individuals with severe/complex neurological disability: an exploration of the literature

Occupational deprivation and individuals with severe/complex neurological disability: an exploration of the literature
Occupational deprivation and individuals with severe/complex neurological disability: an exploration of the literature
Engagement in occupation is as an innate behaviour; an integral and defining aspect of human-ness. The notion of humans as occupational beings endowed with capacities which depend on many complex sub-systems, such as the physical, socio-cultural and transcendental, is central to our understanding. The participation in complex, skilled activities within the domains of self-care, leisure and work is seen as health giving and sustaining. Without this engagement, their health and well-being might be negatively affected. Occupational deprivation is a state of long-lasting exclusion from meaningful occupations, due to circumstances beyond the control of the individual. It is proposed here that present research interest into the specific effects of deprivation may yet take too little account of the situation faced by individuals with complex neurological disabilities who are living within very supportive environments, but nevertheless experiencing a form of deprivation. This paper explores some issues from the literature around occupational deprivation linked to intrinsic causes. Realisation of the negative effects of deprivation might lead to more sustained effort in at least, enhancing opportunities for engagement in enjoyable activities.
Fenech, Anne
998d3edf-6e93-46f4-8351-9286c67b7652
Sadlo, Gaynor
f9b77d21-dee6-437c-8e3c-7da601f53e7a
Fenech, Anne
998d3edf-6e93-46f4-8351-9286c67b7652
Sadlo, Gaynor
f9b77d21-dee6-437c-8e3c-7da601f53e7a

Fenech, Anne and Sadlo, Gaynor (2008) Occupational deprivation and individuals with severe/complex neurological disability: an exploration of the literature. Public Journal of Occupational Therapy.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Engagement in occupation is as an innate behaviour; an integral and defining aspect of human-ness. The notion of humans as occupational beings endowed with capacities which depend on many complex sub-systems, such as the physical, socio-cultural and transcendental, is central to our understanding. The participation in complex, skilled activities within the domains of self-care, leisure and work is seen as health giving and sustaining. Without this engagement, their health and well-being might be negatively affected. Occupational deprivation is a state of long-lasting exclusion from meaningful occupations, due to circumstances beyond the control of the individual. It is proposed here that present research interest into the specific effects of deprivation may yet take too little account of the situation faced by individuals with complex neurological disabilities who are living within very supportive environments, but nevertheless experiencing a form of deprivation. This paper explores some issues from the literature around occupational deprivation linked to intrinsic causes. Realisation of the negative effects of deprivation might lead to more sustained effort in at least, enhancing opportunities for engagement in enjoyable activities.

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More information

Published date: 1 May 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 72596
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72596
PURE UUID: 25f7190a-e900-462a-a53f-2e248551873e
ORCID for Anne Fenech: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5187-2912

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2010
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:35

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Contributors

Author: Anne Fenech ORCID iD
Author: Gaynor Sadlo

University divisions

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