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Interactive drama in complex neurological disability management

Interactive drama in complex neurological disability management
Interactive drama in complex neurological disability management
Purpose. To establish whether interactive drama has any effect on the responses of people with complex neurological disabilities resident in a long term care facility. Method. This was a service evaluation using interviews with a group of 31 independently consenting long term care residents, and 27 staff, and observations of engagement of 74 residents involved in an Interactive Drama Project (92.4% of those who had the opportunity to participate). Results. Twenty five (81%) of the 31 residents interviewed reported a new atmosphere of community spirit, 29 (93%) enjoyed the rehearsals, 28 (90.5%) reported a state of 'flow' and 17 (54.6%) a perception of achievement. Fifteen (55.7%) of the 27 staff who completed questionnaires felt that the project had had a positive effect on staff-resident relationship. Twenty (64.4%) residents and 14 (51.7%) staff reported learning something new about others. Conclusions. The majority of participants with complex neurological disabilities were able to engage with interactive drama for some of the time. Therefore interactive drama offered residents opportunities for enjoyment, achievement, challenge and experiencing meaningful occupations.
0963-8288
118-130
Fenech, Anne
998d3edf-6e93-46f4-8351-9286c67b7652
Fenech, Anne
998d3edf-6e93-46f4-8351-9286c67b7652

Fenech, Anne (2009) Interactive drama in complex neurological disability management. Disability and Rehabilitation, 31 (2), 118-130. (doi:10.1080/09638280701850900).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose. To establish whether interactive drama has any effect on the responses of people with complex neurological disabilities resident in a long term care facility. Method. This was a service evaluation using interviews with a group of 31 independently consenting long term care residents, and 27 staff, and observations of engagement of 74 residents involved in an Interactive Drama Project (92.4% of those who had the opportunity to participate). Results. Twenty five (81%) of the 31 residents interviewed reported a new atmosphere of community spirit, 29 (93%) enjoyed the rehearsals, 28 (90.5%) reported a state of 'flow' and 17 (54.6%) a perception of achievement. Fifteen (55.7%) of the 27 staff who completed questionnaires felt that the project had had a positive effect on staff-resident relationship. Twenty (64.4%) residents and 14 (51.7%) staff reported learning something new about others. Conclusions. The majority of participants with complex neurological disabilities were able to engage with interactive drama for some of the time. Therefore interactive drama offered residents opportunities for enjoyment, achievement, challenge and experiencing meaningful occupations.

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Published date: January 2009
Organisations: Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 72602
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72602
ISSN: 0963-8288
PURE UUID: 92e8d679-29b4-46de-9fbd-3c2a95c6a36f
ORCID for Anne Fenech: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5187-2912

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2010
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 23:43

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