The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Developing culturally sensitive cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis for ethnic minority parents by exploration and incorporation of service users and health professionals views and opinions

Developing culturally sensitive cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis for ethnic minority parents by exploration and incorporation of service users and health professionals views and opinions
Developing culturally sensitive cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis for ethnic minority parents by exploration and incorporation of service users and health professionals views and opinions
A total of 114 participants were interviewed for the study. The results indicate that · Cognitive Behaviour therapy would be an acceptable treatment if culturally adapted. · The way the therapy is delivered would need to be adapted - so more pre-engagement, an understanding of a perspective where family and religion are at the centre of a person's thinking. · Some of the people interviewed saw the counsellor as the "expert" and expected them to have all the answers. This has implications for the relationship between counsellor and client in a CBT relationship. · There were complex language issues - even though the study focused on clients who speak English or can communicate with the use of interpreters- they would revert to their own language to be able to express a particular thought or feeling. E.g. African Caribbean client reverting to patois to explain a particular word. · There are findings on health beliefs, attributions to psychosis and help seeking pathways
National Mental Health Development Unit
Rathod, Shanaya
b4dddbe5-e4aa-4069-bd03-20cd6332639c
Kingdon, David
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Phiri, Peter
bdcad679-98c5-47c5-a7ad-15865f1e880e
Gobbi, Mary
829a5669-2d52-44ef-be96-bc57bf20bea0
Rathod, Shanaya
b4dddbe5-e4aa-4069-bd03-20cd6332639c
Kingdon, David
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Phiri, Peter
bdcad679-98c5-47c5-a7ad-15865f1e880e
Gobbi, Mary
829a5669-2d52-44ef-be96-bc57bf20bea0

Rathod, Shanaya, Kingdon, David, Phiri, Peter and Gobbi, Mary (2009) Developing culturally sensitive cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis for ethnic minority parents by exploration and incorporation of service users and health professionals views and opinions London, UK. National Mental Health Development Unit

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

A total of 114 participants were interviewed for the study. The results indicate that · Cognitive Behaviour therapy would be an acceptable treatment if culturally adapted. · The way the therapy is delivered would need to be adapted - so more pre-engagement, an understanding of a perspective where family and religion are at the centre of a person's thinking. · Some of the people interviewed saw the counsellor as the "expert" and expected them to have all the answers. This has implications for the relationship between counsellor and client in a CBT relationship. · There were complex language issues - even though the study focused on clients who speak English or can communicate with the use of interpreters- they would revert to their own language to be able to express a particular thought or feeling. E.g. African Caribbean client reverting to patois to explain a particular word. · There are findings on health beliefs, attributions to psychosis and help seeking pathways

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 72607
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72607
PURE UUID: e98d7a90-59b2-45f5-bbac-d727cec447ed

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2010
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 13:11

Export record

Contributors

Author: Shanaya Rathod
Author: David Kingdon
Author: Peter Phiri
Author: Mary Gobbi

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×