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Narrative skills following early confirmation of permanent childhood hearing impairment

Narrative skills following early confirmation of permanent childhood hearing impairment
Narrative skills following early confirmation of permanent childhood hearing impairment
Aim: the aim of this study was to compare spoken language production in children with permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) whose PCHI was confirmed either early or late.

Method: audio-taped spoken narrative was assessed for syntax, phonology, morphology, and narrative in transcripts from a population-based sample of 89 children (49 males, 40 females; age mean age 7y 7mo, SD1y 1mo, range 6y 6mo–10y 9mo) with bilateral PCHI (?40dB hearing loss) and a comparison group of 63 children (37 males, 26 females; mean age 8y 1mo; SD 1y) with normal hearing. Of the 89 children with PCHI, 41 (21 males, 20 females) had their hearing impairment confirmed by the age of 9 months. All children with PCHI were tested with hearing aids in place, including 16 with cochlear implants. The group of children whose PCHI had been confirmed by age 9 months was compared with the group with later confirmation of PCHI using regression models on the outcome measures.

Results: compared with those with late-confirmed PCHI, children with early-confirmed PCHI used significantly more sentences (mean difference 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49–5.24; p=0.019) and categories of high-pitched morphological markers (mean difference 6.64; 95% CI 1.96–11.31; p=0.006). The number of categories of low-pitched morphological markers, phonological simplifications, and sentences with multiple clauses did not differ between groups. The odds ratios (95% CI) of superior narrative structure and narrative content in children whose PCHI was confirmed early were 3.03 (1.09–8.46; p=0.034) and 4.43 (1.52–12.89; p=0.006) respectively.

Interpretation: early confirmation compared with late confirmation of PCHI was associated with benefit to narrative skills and to certain expressive aspects of syntax and morphology, but not expressive phonology
0012-1622
922-928
Worsfold, Sarah
9e3f6aa2-8c17-4965-adf4-b3bc1d04ab54
Mahon, Merle
5166ade4-5a04-4fb8-b907-1b83cf7c3a61
Yuen, Ho Ming
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Kennedy, Colin
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93
Worsfold, Sarah
9e3f6aa2-8c17-4965-adf4-b3bc1d04ab54
Mahon, Merle
5166ade4-5a04-4fb8-b907-1b83cf7c3a61
Yuen, Ho Ming
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Kennedy, Colin
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93

Worsfold, Sarah, Mahon, Merle, Yuen, Ho Ming and Kennedy, Colin (2010) Narrative skills following early confirmation of permanent childhood hearing impairment. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 52 (10), 922-928. (doi:10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03641.x). (PMID:20187874)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: the aim of this study was to compare spoken language production in children with permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) whose PCHI was confirmed either early or late.

Method: audio-taped spoken narrative was assessed for syntax, phonology, morphology, and narrative in transcripts from a population-based sample of 89 children (49 males, 40 females; age mean age 7y 7mo, SD1y 1mo, range 6y 6mo–10y 9mo) with bilateral PCHI (?40dB hearing loss) and a comparison group of 63 children (37 males, 26 females; mean age 8y 1mo; SD 1y) with normal hearing. Of the 89 children with PCHI, 41 (21 males, 20 females) had their hearing impairment confirmed by the age of 9 months. All children with PCHI were tested with hearing aids in place, including 16 with cochlear implants. The group of children whose PCHI had been confirmed by age 9 months was compared with the group with later confirmation of PCHI using regression models on the outcome measures.

Results: compared with those with late-confirmed PCHI, children with early-confirmed PCHI used significantly more sentences (mean difference 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49–5.24; p=0.019) and categories of high-pitched morphological markers (mean difference 6.64; 95% CI 1.96–11.31; p=0.006). The number of categories of low-pitched morphological markers, phonological simplifications, and sentences with multiple clauses did not differ between groups. The odds ratios (95% CI) of superior narrative structure and narrative content in children whose PCHI was confirmed early were 3.03 (1.09–8.46; p=0.034) and 4.43 (1.52–12.89; p=0.006) respectively.

Interpretation: early confirmation compared with late confirmation of PCHI was associated with benefit to narrative skills and to certain expressive aspects of syntax and morphology, but not expressive phonology

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More information

Submitted date: December 2009
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 February 2010
Published date: October 2010
Additional Information: Corrected by: Errata, Vol. 52, Issue 9, 879, Article first published online: 16 Aug 2010, DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03770_2.x
Organisations: Clinical Neurosciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 72723
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72723
ISSN: 0012-1622
PURE UUID: 65c95191-f4b2-4eea-be51-d5a1da62725a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Feb 2010
Last modified: 08 Nov 2021 17:16

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Contributors

Author: Sarah Worsfold
Author: Merle Mahon
Author: Ho Ming Yuen
Author: Colin Kennedy

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