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Maternal activity and birth weight: a prospective, population-based study

Maternal activity and birth weight: a prospective, population-based study
Maternal activity and birth weight: a prospective, population-based study
To determine the association between maternal activity and pregnancy outcome, the authors investigated the separate influences of time, physical effort, and posture at work, both at a job and in the home, on birth weight. Study subjects were 1,507 of 1,889 women appearing consecutively for antenatal care at a district general hospital in inner London, England, in 1982-1984. Data were collected prospectively by interview and examination at several stages of pregnancy. Multivariable linear regression was used to distinguish associations with physical activity from confounding by other factors. The mean birth weight of infants born to women in full-time employment was 49 g less than that for births to women not in paid work (95 percent confidence interval (Cl) 1-97 g). However, the difference was due to confounding, and after adjustment, full-time employment was associated with a 12-g increase in birth weight (95 percent Cl -39 to 63 g). There was little difference in birth weight related to gestational stage at leaving work. Duration, physical effort required, and energy expenditure in paid work and in work at home had no discernible association with birth weight. A small increase in birth weight was associated with increased hours of sleep. These data allow estimates of associations with birth weight as precise as 80 g. Within the range of activities performed by pregnant women in the population studied, birth weight is unlikely to be associated with maternal physical activity.
0002-9262
522-531
Rabkin, C.S.
dc1d899a-b0b7-4a13-a332-976a6d496681
Anderson, H.R.
89e583cb-a30d-4dcf-a4dc-14853c5766fc
Bland, J.M.
913aa706-4509-4baa-87ad-50d782170abb
Brooke, O.G.
88db7f12-a26a-47ef-a6ec-936257ba03a5
Chamberlain, G.V.
c4f3ac04-473d-49e8-b8db-7f63d74d0d09
Peacock, J.L.
8362b3b1-458f-4152-936f-344ca1c7e0ba
Rabkin, C.S.
dc1d899a-b0b7-4a13-a332-976a6d496681
Anderson, H.R.
89e583cb-a30d-4dcf-a4dc-14853c5766fc
Bland, J.M.
913aa706-4509-4baa-87ad-50d782170abb
Brooke, O.G.
88db7f12-a26a-47ef-a6ec-936257ba03a5
Chamberlain, G.V.
c4f3ac04-473d-49e8-b8db-7f63d74d0d09
Peacock, J.L.
8362b3b1-458f-4152-936f-344ca1c7e0ba

Rabkin, C.S., Anderson, H.R., Bland, J.M., Brooke, O.G., Chamberlain, G.V. and Peacock, J.L. (1990) Maternal activity and birth weight: a prospective, population-based study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 131 (3), 522-531.

Record type: Article

Abstract

To determine the association between maternal activity and pregnancy outcome, the authors investigated the separate influences of time, physical effort, and posture at work, both at a job and in the home, on birth weight. Study subjects were 1,507 of 1,889 women appearing consecutively for antenatal care at a district general hospital in inner London, England, in 1982-1984. Data were collected prospectively by interview and examination at several stages of pregnancy. Multivariable linear regression was used to distinguish associations with physical activity from confounding by other factors. The mean birth weight of infants born to women in full-time employment was 49 g less than that for births to women not in paid work (95 percent confidence interval (Cl) 1-97 g). However, the difference was due to confounding, and after adjustment, full-time employment was associated with a 12-g increase in birth weight (95 percent Cl -39 to 63 g). There was little difference in birth weight related to gestational stage at leaving work. Duration, physical effort required, and energy expenditure in paid work and in work at home had no discernible association with birth weight. A small increase in birth weight was associated with increased hours of sleep. These data allow estimates of associations with birth weight as precise as 80 g. Within the range of activities performed by pregnant women in the population studied, birth weight is unlikely to be associated with maternal physical activity.

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Published date: 1990

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 72864
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72864
ISSN: 0002-9262
PURE UUID: 0a5ee58d-e4f2-4f9a-8b3d-d8e20cb9f77f

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Date deposited: 25 Feb 2010
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:52

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