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Communication challenges of HPV vaccination

Communication challenges of HPV vaccination
Communication challenges of HPV vaccination
Background: The UK has introduced a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme for girls aged 12–13 from autumn 2008. Previous research has explored public understanding of the causes of cervical cancer and found little awareness of the role of HPV.

Objective: To explore GPs' and practice nurses' views of HPV vaccination, prior to implementation of the national immunisation programme, with a focus on their role and anticipated difficulties.

Methods: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 GPs and practice nurses from practices in Hampshire and Wiltshire, in March 2008.

Results: The prevailing theme of new communication challenges was identified and these were connected to the activities of (i) explaining, (ii) consenting and (iii) managing conflicts between parents and their children with respect to vaccination decisions. The importance of decisions being fully informed was emphasized and concern was expressed about the adequacy of the information provided to girls and their parents in schools. Whether consent would be granted by the parent or by the child and how potential disagreements should be managed remained ambiguous. Participants considered it appropriate to offer the vaccine without parental consent if other criteria, such as an assessment of competency, were met.

Conclusions: Success of the national immunization programme will depend on overcoming the challenges of providing explanations to ensure that individuals understand the potential benefits of HPV vaccination. Primary care can play an important role, but this study suggests there are fundamental issues that need further clarification.
adolescent medicine, communication skills, preventive medicine, qualitative research
0263-2136
224-229
Brown, Elizabeth C.F.
2b72ba0d-5905-4445-8e2c-cf7f86b3a59e
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Leydon, Geraldine M.
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40
GRACE Project Group
Brown, Elizabeth C.F.
2b72ba0d-5905-4445-8e2c-cf7f86b3a59e
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Leydon, Geraldine M.
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40

Brown, Elizabeth C.F., Little, Paul and Leydon, Geraldine M. , GRACE Project Group (2010) Communication challenges of HPV vaccination. Family Practice, 27 (2), 224-229. (doi:10.1093/fampra/cmp087).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The UK has introduced a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme for girls aged 12–13 from autumn 2008. Previous research has explored public understanding of the causes of cervical cancer and found little awareness of the role of HPV.

Objective: To explore GPs' and practice nurses' views of HPV vaccination, prior to implementation of the national immunisation programme, with a focus on their role and anticipated difficulties.

Methods: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 GPs and practice nurses from practices in Hampshire and Wiltshire, in March 2008.

Results: The prevailing theme of new communication challenges was identified and these were connected to the activities of (i) explaining, (ii) consenting and (iii) managing conflicts between parents and their children with respect to vaccination decisions. The importance of decisions being fully informed was emphasized and concern was expressed about the adequacy of the information provided to girls and their parents in schools. Whether consent would be granted by the parent or by the child and how potential disagreements should be managed remained ambiguous. Participants considered it appropriate to offer the vaccine without parental consent if other criteria, such as an assessment of competency, were met.

Conclusions: Success of the national immunization programme will depend on overcoming the challenges of providing explanations to ensure that individuals understand the potential benefits of HPV vaccination. Primary care can play an important role, but this study suggests there are fundamental issues that need further clarification.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 18 December 2009
Published date: April 2010
Keywords: adolescent medicine, communication skills, preventive medicine, qualitative research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 73705
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/73705
ISSN: 0263-2136
PURE UUID: 9d18b926-ee77-4547-abb5-57d6a151c1d4
ORCID for Geraldine M. Leydon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5986-3300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:56

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