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Driving automation: Learning from aviation about design philosophies

Driving automation: Learning from aviation about design philosophies
Driving automation: Learning from aviation about design philosophies
Whether we like it or not, automation is gradually taking over the driver’s role. Full vehicle automation is predicted to be on British roads by 2030 (Walker et al., 2001). However, experience in aviation gives us some cause for concern for the ‘drive-by-wire’ car (Stanton & Marsden, 1996). Problems of workload and situation awareness have been attributed as the root cause of some aircraft accidents (Beaty, 1995). These problems may be approached in two different ways, depending on the level of automation used. These two philosophies are exemplified by the positions of the two major aircraft manufacturers. Airbus use a ‘hard protection’ system in their A320 and A340 series, employing automation to prevent error, and hence it can override the pilot. Boeing, on the other hand, opted for ‘soft protection’ in their 777 aircraft, using automation as a tool to aid pilots, and not giving it the authority to override pilot control (Hughes & Dornheim, 1995). This paper speculates whether hard or soft automation provides the best solution for road vehicles, and considers an alternative design philosophy in vehicles of the future based on coordination and cooperation
automation, automobiles, aviation, CRM, human-centred design
1741-5314
323-338
Young, Mark S.
f7204378-f076-4b00-a9ae-edc94695abb7
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Harris, Don
4840ad19-c4c3-4e06-9846-589b330a3668
Young, Mark S.
f7204378-f076-4b00-a9ae-edc94695abb7
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Harris, Don
4840ad19-c4c3-4e06-9846-589b330a3668

Young, Mark S., Stanton, Neville A. and Harris, Don (2007) Driving automation: Learning from aviation about design philosophies. International Journal of Vehicle Design, 45 (3), 323-338. (doi:10.1504/IJVD.2007.014908).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Whether we like it or not, automation is gradually taking over the driver’s role. Full vehicle automation is predicted to be on British roads by 2030 (Walker et al., 2001). However, experience in aviation gives us some cause for concern for the ‘drive-by-wire’ car (Stanton & Marsden, 1996). Problems of workload and situation awareness have been attributed as the root cause of some aircraft accidents (Beaty, 1995). These problems may be approached in two different ways, depending on the level of automation used. These two philosophies are exemplified by the positions of the two major aircraft manufacturers. Airbus use a ‘hard protection’ system in their A320 and A340 series, employing automation to prevent error, and hence it can override the pilot. Boeing, on the other hand, opted for ‘soft protection’ in their 777 aircraft, using automation as a tool to aid pilots, and not giving it the authority to override pilot control (Hughes & Dornheim, 1995). This paper speculates whether hard or soft automation provides the best solution for road vehicles, and considers an alternative design philosophy in vehicles of the future based on coordination and cooperation

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More information

Published date: 2007
Keywords: automation, automobiles, aviation, CRM, human-centred design

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 73894
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/73894
ISSN: 1741-5314
PURE UUID: d0e62f72-edcf-4c5e-ba9a-82dbbadbcd20
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Mar 2010
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:42

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