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Uncoupling of liquid and solid retention times in anaerobic digestion of catering wastes

Uncoupling of liquid and solid retention times in anaerobic digestion of catering wastes
Uncoupling of liquid and solid retention times in anaerobic digestion of catering wastes
Source-separated food wastes collected from a university campus catering facility were processed in bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The feedstock contained a varied mix of fruits, vegetables, meats and fried foods. Two modes of digestion were compared. The first was hydraulic flush (HF) mode, in which liquids were flushed through the reactor on a retention time of 25 days while solids were maintained on an extended retention time of over 150 days. The converse was a solids wastage (SW) mode, in which liquid retention time was over 150 days, and solids were wasted to maintain a retention time of 25 days. SW reactors exhibited methanogenic failure after approximately 45 days. HF reactors, in contrast, maintained stable digestion for a period of 100 days, and were robust enough to recover from a thermal shock applied over a three-day period in which the temperature was increased from 35°C to 50°C between days 105–108 of the experiment. Stable operation was regained by day 139 and continued until the end of the run on day 150
anaerobic digestion, catering wastes, food wastes, hydraulic flush, solid–liquid separation, solids retention time
0273-1223
1581-1587
Climenhaga, M.A.
6e714444-1be6-4b73-8388-ea447a6cc0af
Banks, C.J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Climenhaga, M.A.
6e714444-1be6-4b73-8388-ea447a6cc0af
Banks, C.J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f

Climenhaga, M.A. and Banks, C.J. (2008) Uncoupling of liquid and solid retention times in anaerobic digestion of catering wastes. Water Science & Technology, 58 (8), 1581-1587. (doi:10.2166/wst.2008.497). (PMID:19001711)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Source-separated food wastes collected from a university campus catering facility were processed in bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The feedstock contained a varied mix of fruits, vegetables, meats and fried foods. Two modes of digestion were compared. The first was hydraulic flush (HF) mode, in which liquids were flushed through the reactor on a retention time of 25 days while solids were maintained on an extended retention time of over 150 days. The converse was a solids wastage (SW) mode, in which liquid retention time was over 150 days, and solids were wasted to maintain a retention time of 25 days. SW reactors exhibited methanogenic failure after approximately 45 days. HF reactors, in contrast, maintained stable digestion for a period of 100 days, and were robust enough to recover from a thermal shock applied over a three-day period in which the temperature was increased from 35°C to 50°C between days 105–108 of the experiment. Stable operation was regained by day 139 and continued until the end of the run on day 150

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Climenhaga and Banks SRT_2008_post_print.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 2008
Keywords: anaerobic digestion, catering wastes, food wastes, hydraulic flush, solid–liquid separation, solids retention time
Organisations: Civil Engineering & the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 74106
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/74106
ISSN: 0273-1223
PURE UUID: d1ffc53c-eddb-49f8-ba15-5b26d9988854

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 23:40

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