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Improving social technologies for recycling

Improving social technologies for recycling
Improving social technologies for recycling
Although kerbside recycling participation rates have been well studied, little consideration has been paid to dense housing, especially high-rise estates, even though such areas have particularly low participation rates.
Because such areas present infrastructural difficulties for recyclates storage and collections, reduced service often results.
Nevertheless, solutions still emphasise communication strategies and householder responsibility over adequate infrastructural provision. This paper draws together three empirically based analyses focusing on the improvement of waste collection procedures and infrastructural design for high- and low-rise dense housing.
Two sites were studied: an inner London estate and Portsmouth. Both sites have minimal storage space either within the home or in external private, communal or public areas. Both areas have high churn rates.
Analysis of the findings suggests that consideration needs to be given to several factors: social, architectural, technological, infrastructural and organisational. Communication strategies need to be simple and consistent and need to acknowledge non- Anglophone residents. Spatial ownership needs to be clearly demarcated and maintained.
Solutions must be tailored to existing exigencies of the built environment (such as poor vehicular access) and need to include broader infrastructural factors such as functioning lifts and convenient, safe storage facilities. New-build is better placed to integrate a flexible collection infrastructure.
However, pressure to increase housing density is providing a continuing challenge to design appropriate storage and collection infrastructures.
recycling & reuse of materials, social impact, waste management & disposal
1747-6526
15-28
Alexander, C.
048578b3-aed1-4394-b32e-5948d548ac56
Smaje, C.
60369a2a-ae60-4e5f-9281-424b56f2dd4b
Timlett, R.
0669c411-d30b-4e5d-b60e-5636a42a68a5
Williams, I.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Alexander, C.
048578b3-aed1-4394-b32e-5948d548ac56
Smaje, C.
60369a2a-ae60-4e5f-9281-424b56f2dd4b
Timlett, R.
0669c411-d30b-4e5d-b60e-5636a42a68a5
Williams, I.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Alexander, C., Smaje, C., Timlett, R. and Williams, I. (2009) Improving social technologies for recycling. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Waste and Resource Management, 162 (1), 15-28. (doi:10.1680/warm.2009.162.1.15).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although kerbside recycling participation rates have been well studied, little consideration has been paid to dense housing, especially high-rise estates, even though such areas have particularly low participation rates.
Because such areas present infrastructural difficulties for recyclates storage and collections, reduced service often results.
Nevertheless, solutions still emphasise communication strategies and householder responsibility over adequate infrastructural provision. This paper draws together three empirically based analyses focusing on the improvement of waste collection procedures and infrastructural design for high- and low-rise dense housing.
Two sites were studied: an inner London estate and Portsmouth. Both sites have minimal storage space either within the home or in external private, communal or public areas. Both areas have high churn rates.
Analysis of the findings suggests that consideration needs to be given to several factors: social, architectural, technological, infrastructural and organisational. Communication strategies need to be simple and consistent and need to acknowledge non- Anglophone residents. Spatial ownership needs to be clearly demarcated and maintained.
Solutions must be tailored to existing exigencies of the built environment (such as poor vehicular access) and need to include broader infrastructural factors such as functioning lifts and convenient, safe storage facilities. New-build is better placed to integrate a flexible collection infrastructure.
However, pressure to increase housing density is providing a continuing challenge to design appropriate storage and collection infrastructures.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: February 2009
Keywords: recycling & reuse of materials, social impact, waste management & disposal
Organisations: Civil Engineering & the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 74143
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/74143
ISSN: 1747-6526
PURE UUID: 5a8793b2-4a27-4f47-8803-eac77caacc50
ORCID for I. Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:46

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