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Behavioural compensation by drivers of a simulator when using a vision enhancement system

Record type: Article

Technological progress is suggesting dramatic changes to the tasks of the driver, with the general aim of making driving environment safer. Before any of these technologies are implemented, empirical research is required to establish if these devices do, in fact, bring about the anticipated improvements. Initially, at least, simulated driving environments offer a means of conducting this research. The study reported here concentrates on the application of a vision enhancement (VE) system within the risk homeostasis paradigm. It was anticipated, in line with risk homeostasis theory, that drivers would compensate for the reduction in risk by increasing speed. The results support the hypothesis although, after a simulated failure of the VE system, drivers did reduce their speed due to reduced confidence in the reliability of the system.

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Citation

Stanton, Neville A. and Pinto, Marcel (2000) Behavioural compensation by drivers of a simulator when using a vision enhancement system Ergonomics, 43, (9), pp. 1359-1370. (doi:10.1080/001401300421806).

More information

Published date: September 2000
Keywords: vision, enhancement, driving, rht, simulation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 76093
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/76093
ISSN: 1366-5847
PURE UUID: a567c912-7ece-46f3-a62e-64799249337b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:41

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