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Hydraulic properties of MSW

Hydraulic properties of MSW
Hydraulic properties of MSW
The science of understanding fluid flow in waste materials is both complicated and in a state of evolution. In general, however, it is possible to apply soil mechanics and hydrogeological principles to waste, although care needs to be taken with standard phase relationships for a number of reasons. Firstly, there is a great potential for confusion between terms, as landfill science has borrowed definitions from different disciplines which very often have slightly different meanings and derivations. Secondly, the impact of gas is a complicating factor, especially as it is being generated in situ. And finally ongoing degradation can cause a volume reduction in solids, a factor not dealt with in any other area involving fluid flow through porous media. There has been a reasonable amount of research and understanding of saturated waste hydraulics. Darcy's law is routinely applied and appears satisfactory for most eventualities. Changes in effective stress on first loading appears to be the dominant influence on hydrogeological properties, especially hydraulic conductivity, with secondary influences coming from gas, differences in waste composition and possibly degradation. Waste anisotropy and heterogeneity are also other important considerations. Less is known about unsaturated waste hydraulics, and indeed the applicability of standard unsaturated flow theory to waste has not been proven. For example there is considerable uncertainty about the nature and form of water retention curves for waste. Standard theory usually relates parameters to saturated conditions, but the link between saturated and unsaturated waste hydraulics is difficult to define, partly because ongoing gas generation in landfills probably mean that truly saturated conditions never exist. At present there is not enough data on the impact of gas generation, distribution and movement on unsaturated flow parameters
Beaven, Richard P.
5893d749-f03c-4c55-b9c9-e90f00a32b57
Powrie, William
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Zardava, Kiriaki
77cd104e-b7c6-4aa9-9459-065193b92867
Beaven, Richard P.
5893d749-f03c-4c55-b9c9-e90f00a32b57
Powrie, William
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Zardava, Kiriaki
77cd104e-b7c6-4aa9-9459-065193b92867

Beaven, Richard P., Powrie, William and Zardava, Kiriaki (2008) Hydraulic properties of MSW. 2008 International Symposium on Waste Mechanics, New Orleans, United States. (doi:10.1061/41146(395)1).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The science of understanding fluid flow in waste materials is both complicated and in a state of evolution. In general, however, it is possible to apply soil mechanics and hydrogeological principles to waste, although care needs to be taken with standard phase relationships for a number of reasons. Firstly, there is a great potential for confusion between terms, as landfill science has borrowed definitions from different disciplines which very often have slightly different meanings and derivations. Secondly, the impact of gas is a complicating factor, especially as it is being generated in situ. And finally ongoing degradation can cause a volume reduction in solids, a factor not dealt with in any other area involving fluid flow through porous media. There has been a reasonable amount of research and understanding of saturated waste hydraulics. Darcy's law is routinely applied and appears satisfactory for most eventualities. Changes in effective stress on first loading appears to be the dominant influence on hydrogeological properties, especially hydraulic conductivity, with secondary influences coming from gas, differences in waste composition and possibly degradation. Waste anisotropy and heterogeneity are also other important considerations. Less is known about unsaturated waste hydraulics, and indeed the applicability of standard unsaturated flow theory to waste has not been proven. For example there is considerable uncertainty about the nature and form of water retention curves for waste. Standard theory usually relates parameters to saturated conditions, but the link between saturated and unsaturated waste hydraulics is difficult to define, partly because ongoing gas generation in landfills probably mean that truly saturated conditions never exist. At present there is not enough data on the impact of gas generation, distribution and movement on unsaturated flow parameters

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More information

Published date: 13 March 2008
Venue - Dates: 2008 International Symposium on Waste Mechanics, New Orleans, United States, 2008-01-01

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 76184
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/76184
PURE UUID: eb253418-7b29-4590-828d-5a64c3c29ae8
ORCID for Richard P. Beaven: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1387-8299
ORCID for William Powrie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2271-0826

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 06 Jan 2023 02:35

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Contributors

Author: William Powrie ORCID iD
Author: Kiriaki Zardava

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