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Quantum interference and poling in optical glass waveguides

Quantum interference and poling in optical glass waveguides
Quantum interference and poling in optical glass waveguides
Optical glass-fibres and waveguides dominate optical communications. The development of linear electrooptic modulators/switches and parametric frequency converters directly integrated into optical glass waveguide structures technologically is very attractive. However such components require u second-order nonlinearity - a chi (2), which is normally absent in glass owing to its inversion symmetry. Thus, when self-organised frequency doubling was first discovered wide-ranging studies ensued into the mechanism and properties of this unexpected phenomenon. The mystery of photoinduced chi (2) gratings was finally solved on the basis of a new physical phenomenon - the coherent photogalvanic effect, consisting in quantum interference, which excites a phase dependent current (coherent photocurrent). Coherent photocurrent induces quasi-phase matching chi (2) gratings. More recently the value of nonlinearity has been increased to a level, comparable to the best nonlinear crystals by new poling techniques. Moreover in the experiments on fibre electric field poling the first evidence of phase dependent modulation of a total cross-section of ionization due to quantum interference (coherent photoconductivity) in solid state materials has heen obtained
Kazansky, P.G.
a5d123ec-8ea8-408c-8963-4a6d921fd76c
Kazansky, P.G.
a5d123ec-8ea8-408c-8963-4a6d921fd76c

Kazansky, P.G. (1998) Quantum interference and poling in optical glass waveguides. Photosensitivity in Optical Waveguides and Glasses, Switzerland. 13 - 18 Jul 1998.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Optical glass-fibres and waveguides dominate optical communications. The development of linear electrooptic modulators/switches and parametric frequency converters directly integrated into optical glass waveguide structures technologically is very attractive. However such components require u second-order nonlinearity - a chi (2), which is normally absent in glass owing to its inversion symmetry. Thus, when self-organised frequency doubling was first discovered wide-ranging studies ensued into the mechanism and properties of this unexpected phenomenon. The mystery of photoinduced chi (2) gratings was finally solved on the basis of a new physical phenomenon - the coherent photogalvanic effect, consisting in quantum interference, which excites a phase dependent current (coherent photocurrent). Coherent photocurrent induces quasi-phase matching chi (2) gratings. More recently the value of nonlinearity has been increased to a level, comparable to the best nonlinear crystals by new poling techniques. Moreover in the experiments on fibre electric field poling the first evidence of phase dependent modulation of a total cross-section of ionization due to quantum interference (coherent photoconductivity) in solid state materials has heen obtained

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Published date: July 1998
Venue - Dates: Photosensitivity in Optical Waveguides and Glasses, Switzerland, 1998-07-13 - 1998-07-18

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Local EPrints ID: 76611
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/76611
PURE UUID: 255e9fa2-786c-4c54-9078-1dac7b5f906d

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Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:39

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Contributors

Author: P.G. Kazansky

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