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Exotic fibres

Exotic fibres
Exotic fibres
Optical fibres for telecommunications are well known, have been studied in detail, and are being applied extensively in public telephone networks. However there is rapidly increasing interest in the use of fibres as sensors and transducers. The paper describes the fabrication of optical fibres of novel design and incorporating new materials, including twisted, spun and helical-core fibres, as well as highly birefringent and single-polarisation, single-mode fibres. A new technique has been developed at Southampton University for incorporating rare-earth ions into the core of a single-mode fibre with the aim of producing laser action, as well as a distributed temperature sensor. These fibres have also provided, for the first time, continuous-wave operation when pumped by a simple semiconductor laser diode. The new fibre lasers have also been operated as amplifiers and tunable optical sources. They are simple, flexible, do not need optical alignment and are relatively unaffected by environmental conditions
optical fibre, optical polarization, birefringent medium, linear polarization, circular polarization, manufacturing, mechanical stress, doping, lanthanide, solid laser
0003-4347
541-546
Gambling, W.A.
70d15b3d-eaf7-44ed-9120-7ae47ba68324
Gambling, W.A.
70d15b3d-eaf7-44ed-9120-7ae47ba68324

Gambling, W.A. (1986) Exotic fibres. Annales of Telecommunications, 41 (11-12), 541-546. (doi:10.1007/BF02997851).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Optical fibres for telecommunications are well known, have been studied in detail, and are being applied extensively in public telephone networks. However there is rapidly increasing interest in the use of fibres as sensors and transducers. The paper describes the fabrication of optical fibres of novel design and incorporating new materials, including twisted, spun and helical-core fibres, as well as highly birefringent and single-polarisation, single-mode fibres. A new technique has been developed at Southampton University for incorporating rare-earth ions into the core of a single-mode fibre with the aim of producing laser action, as well as a distributed temperature sensor. These fibres have also provided, for the first time, continuous-wave operation when pumped by a simple semiconductor laser diode. The new fibre lasers have also been operated as amplifiers and tunable optical sources. They are simple, flexible, do not need optical alignment and are relatively unaffected by environmental conditions

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Published date: November 1986
Venue - Dates: Annales des Telecommunications 7th French National Symposium on Guided Optics, 1986-11-01
Keywords: optical fibre, optical polarization, birefringent medium, linear polarization, circular polarization, manufacturing, mechanical stress, doping, lanthanide, solid laser

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 77655
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/77655
ISSN: 0003-4347
PURE UUID: 19702110-7f02-4fe4-bdf2-5e859f56c4d2

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Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 13 Dec 2018 17:31

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Contributors

Author: W.A. Gambling

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