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Optical immunoprobe development for multiresidue monitoring in water

Optical immunoprobe development for multiresidue monitoring in water
Optical immunoprobe development for multiresidue monitoring in water
Aquifers used for drinking water production require regular monitoring for organic pollutants. Pollutant levels and pollutant patterns may change rapidly especially in surface water. Monitoring systems capable of unattended and automated operation are desirable e.g. at pumping sites. In this paper we report on a study of the application of immunoanalytical techniques for flexible and automated multiresidue testing. A solid phase fluorescence immunoassay with immobilised analyte derivate and free, florescence labelled antibody is used. Two optical transducers were tested: A simple 'slab'-waveguide made of sheet glass and an integrated optical (IO) waveguide. Bulk fluorophore excitation was used to estimate the performance of each transducer. Both transducers allow an antibody surface coverage of less than 1% of a monolayer of protein to be detected. The direct and covalent immobilisation of analyte derivates at the transducer surface for a binding inhibition assay approach is compared to a competitive assay with immobilisation of analyte derivates via an auxiliary antibody conjugate. The use of this auxiliary system allows the testing of different analytes at the same transducer surface. Atrazine was selected as a model analyte for the first trials. The ELISA type assay gives a test midpoint at 2.2µg/l and an estimated limit of detection of 0.3µg/l. The fluoroimmunoprobe with a binding inhibition assay has a test midpoint for atrazine at about 6µg/l. In the competitive assay with an auxiliary antibody conjugate signal levels were reduced by a factor of two and competition of free atrazine was poor. Titration with free analyte derivate (atrazine caproic acid) confirmed that this may be optimised by changing the competing derivate.
0003-2670
69-79
Brecht, A.
1b34ee2a-ada5-48ec-923a-f385835fbc83
Klotz, A.
6295d51a-2cbd-4ebd-ac4f-de919e314636
Barzen, C.
e57de777-3451-4b75-b44a-937e8a317e5b
Gauglitz, G.
119b102d-52db-4eba-81c0-0bdd5a16f1e7
Harris, R.D.
e972b676-3335-44cd-b6e8-0dae17c550c3
Quigley, G.R.
7d719dee-8822-4f48-9a29-52c7bc000a27
Wilkinson, J.S.
73483cf3-d9f2-4688-9b09-1c84257884ca
Sztajnbok, P.
50e1d6ea-ee8d-49f9-bec2-02dd8e6678f7
Abuknesha, R.
5d66fe81-0e42-4c2f-af72-213ad83c731c
Gascon, J.
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Oubinam, A.
d42f8529-80a7-4c88-a350-13bd142d6589
Barceló, D.
70714911-7029-4646-b6cf-56a7b71c0fd6
Brecht, A.
1b34ee2a-ada5-48ec-923a-f385835fbc83
Klotz, A.
6295d51a-2cbd-4ebd-ac4f-de919e314636
Barzen, C.
e57de777-3451-4b75-b44a-937e8a317e5b
Gauglitz, G.
119b102d-52db-4eba-81c0-0bdd5a16f1e7
Harris, R.D.
e972b676-3335-44cd-b6e8-0dae17c550c3
Quigley, G.R.
7d719dee-8822-4f48-9a29-52c7bc000a27
Wilkinson, J.S.
73483cf3-d9f2-4688-9b09-1c84257884ca
Sztajnbok, P.
50e1d6ea-ee8d-49f9-bec2-02dd8e6678f7
Abuknesha, R.
5d66fe81-0e42-4c2f-af72-213ad83c731c
Gascon, J.
2bafc057-ba2b-479b-9f9c-6c76e23cf52e
Oubinam, A.
d42f8529-80a7-4c88-a350-13bd142d6589
Barceló, D.
70714911-7029-4646-b6cf-56a7b71c0fd6

Brecht, A., Klotz, A., Barzen, C., Gauglitz, G., Harris, R.D., Quigley, G.R., Wilkinson, J.S., Sztajnbok, P., Abuknesha, R., Gascon, J., Oubinam, A. and Barceló, D. (1998) Optical immunoprobe development for multiresidue monitoring in water. Analytica Chimica Acta, 362 (1), 69-79.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aquifers used for drinking water production require regular monitoring for organic pollutants. Pollutant levels and pollutant patterns may change rapidly especially in surface water. Monitoring systems capable of unattended and automated operation are desirable e.g. at pumping sites. In this paper we report on a study of the application of immunoanalytical techniques for flexible and automated multiresidue testing. A solid phase fluorescence immunoassay with immobilised analyte derivate and free, florescence labelled antibody is used. Two optical transducers were tested: A simple 'slab'-waveguide made of sheet glass and an integrated optical (IO) waveguide. Bulk fluorophore excitation was used to estimate the performance of each transducer. Both transducers allow an antibody surface coverage of less than 1% of a monolayer of protein to be detected. The direct and covalent immobilisation of analyte derivates at the transducer surface for a binding inhibition assay approach is compared to a competitive assay with immobilisation of analyte derivates via an auxiliary antibody conjugate. The use of this auxiliary system allows the testing of different analytes at the same transducer surface. Atrazine was selected as a model analyte for the first trials. The ELISA type assay gives a test midpoint at 2.2µg/l and an estimated limit of detection of 0.3µg/l. The fluoroimmunoprobe with a binding inhibition assay has a test midpoint for atrazine at about 6µg/l. In the competitive assay with an auxiliary antibody conjugate signal levels were reduced by a factor of two and competition of free atrazine was poor. Titration with free analyte derivate (atrazine caproic acid) confirmed that this may be optimised by changing the competing derivate.

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Published date: April 1998

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 77851
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/77851
ISSN: 0003-2670
PURE UUID: 93c58387-60d5-40bf-9c71-203d6abc8eae
ORCID for J.S. Wilkinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4712-1697

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Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:19

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Contributors

Author: A. Brecht
Author: A. Klotz
Author: C. Barzen
Author: G. Gauglitz
Author: R.D. Harris
Author: G.R. Quigley
Author: J.S. Wilkinson ORCID iD
Author: P. Sztajnbok
Author: R. Abuknesha
Author: J. Gascon
Author: A. Oubinam
Author: D. Barceló

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