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Non-invasive, optical measurement of absolute blood volume in haemodialysis patients

Non-invasive, optical measurement of absolute blood volume in haemodialysis patients
Non-invasive, optical measurement of absolute blood volume in haemodialysis patients
During haemodialysis, fluid is removed from, or infused into patients after careful clinical assessment of their hydration states. Unfortunately, these assessments are often imprecise, resulting in either fluid overload or intravascular volume depletion. Since hypovolaemia plays an important role in symptomatic hypotension, which complicates up to 25% of dialysis treatments, there has been increased interest in blood volume (BV) monitoring in recent years. Previous authors have suggested monitoring change in BV during dialysis by examining alterations in optical density, optical reflection, mass density, viscosity, protein concentration or electrical conductivity. However, none of these described methods has measured absolute BV, which is at least as important a determinant of dialysis-related hypotension as the relative change in BV. The best method currently available is measurement of red cell and plasma volumes by dilution of radioactively labelled blood elements. The time-consuming nature of this method and the exposure of the patient to radiation makes it unsuitable for routine clinical use, especially if a number of studies are required.
0085-2538
255-260
Johnson, David W.
a807544b-f434-489c-8c3c-42cb41b72693
McMahon, Miriam
0471af14-ddcc-4576-8a03-a36866c19884
Campbell, Scott
ebb3d23c-e3ef-4086-a2d3-87e117023276
Wilkinson, James
73483cf3-d9f2-4688-9b09-1c84257884ca
Kime, Neil
59a34aa3-723a-4c20-a6d4-1a199a24d70f
Shannon, Gerald
7c9400df-2943-4397-a4fb-4536d2872339
Fleming, Simon J.
309f8faa-19b5-49fc-a360-190dfbf8001f
Johnson, David W.
a807544b-f434-489c-8c3c-42cb41b72693
McMahon, Miriam
0471af14-ddcc-4576-8a03-a36866c19884
Campbell, Scott
ebb3d23c-e3ef-4086-a2d3-87e117023276
Wilkinson, James
73483cf3-d9f2-4688-9b09-1c84257884ca
Kime, Neil
59a34aa3-723a-4c20-a6d4-1a199a24d70f
Shannon, Gerald
7c9400df-2943-4397-a4fb-4536d2872339
Fleming, Simon J.
309f8faa-19b5-49fc-a360-190dfbf8001f

Johnson, David W., McMahon, Miriam, Campbell, Scott, Wilkinson, James, Kime, Neil, Shannon, Gerald and Fleming, Simon J. (1996) Non-invasive, optical measurement of absolute blood volume in haemodialysis patients. Kidney International, 49 (1), 255-260. (PMID:8770977)

Record type: Article

Abstract

During haemodialysis, fluid is removed from, or infused into patients after careful clinical assessment of their hydration states. Unfortunately, these assessments are often imprecise, resulting in either fluid overload or intravascular volume depletion. Since hypovolaemia plays an important role in symptomatic hypotension, which complicates up to 25% of dialysis treatments, there has been increased interest in blood volume (BV) monitoring in recent years. Previous authors have suggested monitoring change in BV during dialysis by examining alterations in optical density, optical reflection, mass density, viscosity, protein concentration or electrical conductivity. However, none of these described methods has measured absolute BV, which is at least as important a determinant of dialysis-related hypotension as the relative change in BV. The best method currently available is measurement of red cell and plasma volumes by dilution of radioactively labelled blood elements. The time-consuming nature of this method and the exposure of the patient to radiation makes it unsuitable for routine clinical use, especially if a number of studies are required.

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More information

Published date: January 1996

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 78127
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/78127
ISSN: 0085-2538
PURE UUID: 4edbc1ad-0abf-4f02-916c-72cc8181dbdd
ORCID for James Wilkinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4712-1697

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Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:19

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