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Optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in semiconductor quantum wells

Optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in semiconductor quantum wells
Optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in semiconductor quantum wells
We demonstrate use of a spatially selective optical pumping technique to investigate NMR in GaAs quantum wells. The method has previously been used to study bulk semiconductors but not lower dimensional systems. For this its sensitivity (<1011 spins) and optical selectively offer unique advantages which allow discrimination of quantum well nuclei from those in the substrate and buffer layers. Circularly polarised interband optical excitation and recombination are used to generate and monitor spin-polarised conduction electrons. The nuclear spins of the lattice are strongly polarised by contact hyperfine interaction (AI.S) with electrons, and NMR is detected as a dip in circular polarisation of the electron recombination radiation at resonance. The technique has a variety of possible applications including study of confined electron distributions, measurement of strain in stained layer systems via quadrupole splitting of NMR, and detection and identification of impurities.
0022-2313
218-220
Flinn, G.P.
a4fa86b9-2ba7-4d33-a75a-dc851166b079
Harley, R.T.
54613031-f60f-45f4-9b20-e49bcfd53b77
Snelling, M.J.
52851363-73f3-4934-a44b-77ae5f54b16a
Tropper, A.C.
f3505426-e0d5-4e91-aed3-aecdb44b393c
Kerr, T.M.
64f7681c-d5ab-42d2-84ba-c7e52e1f9767
Flinn, G.P.
a4fa86b9-2ba7-4d33-a75a-dc851166b079
Harley, R.T.
54613031-f60f-45f4-9b20-e49bcfd53b77
Snelling, M.J.
52851363-73f3-4934-a44b-77ae5f54b16a
Tropper, A.C.
f3505426-e0d5-4e91-aed3-aecdb44b393c
Kerr, T.M.
64f7681c-d5ab-42d2-84ba-c7e52e1f9767

Flinn, G.P., Harley, R.T., Snelling, M.J., Tropper, A.C. and Kerr, T.M. (1990) Optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in semiconductor quantum wells. Journal of Luminescence, 45, 218-220. (doi:10.1016/0022-2313(90)90150-A).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We demonstrate use of a spatially selective optical pumping technique to investigate NMR in GaAs quantum wells. The method has previously been used to study bulk semiconductors but not lower dimensional systems. For this its sensitivity (<1011 spins) and optical selectively offer unique advantages which allow discrimination of quantum well nuclei from those in the substrate and buffer layers. Circularly polarised interband optical excitation and recombination are used to generate and monitor spin-polarised conduction electrons. The nuclear spins of the lattice are strongly polarised by contact hyperfine interaction (AI.S) with electrons, and NMR is detected as a dip in circular polarisation of the electron recombination radiation at resonance. The technique has a variety of possible applications including study of confined electron distributions, measurement of strain in stained layer systems via quadrupole splitting of NMR, and detection and identification of impurities.

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Published date: 1990

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 78610
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/78610
ISSN: 0022-2313
PURE UUID: 896c7fa4-9a09-422d-a5b9-a69bb7c2f304

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Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 09 Jul 2018 16:32

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