The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Cellular modelling of the laser-induced forward transfer of micro - and nano-scale droplets

Cellular modelling of the laser-induced forward transfer of micro - and nano-scale droplets
Cellular modelling of the laser-induced forward transfer of micro - and nano-scale droplets
Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) [1] of micro- and nano-scale droplets is a relatively well-understood process experimentally [2,3]. By careful control of the applied laser fluence to just melt through a thin source film (the donor), it is possible to transfer single droplets of the film to a receiver substrate placed nearby. Such droplets can be micron [2] or sub-micron [3] in diameter and have potential applications in plasmonic devices. The process is inherently complex involving laser-induced phase changes (which may be non-thermal on femtosecond timescales), droplet growth from fluid flow in thin molten films, moving boundaries, and the flight dynamics of the droplet during transfer and upon impact at the receiver. At present, a complete model that encompasses all these different phenomena is still lacking. However, an approximate numerical model of the process would be highly desirable so that the various experimental parameters (laser fluence, donor thickness, donor-receiver separation etc.) can be optimised for minimum droplets sizes and close deposit spacing. One method of modelling highly complex processes is to use cellular automata [4]. In a cellular automaton, the spatial domain is split into a regular grid of cells whose states evolve in time according to a set of rules based on the states of neighbouring cells. An advantage of this technique for highly complex systems such as the LIFT of droplets is that rules which reproduce the behaviour of a system can be found without explicit derivation from the underlying physical equations.
Xu, X.
6da974fd-c59c-4388-8eaf-73017928017a
Banks, D.P.
293424e9-92eb-46f3-8871-40e8d3672b3c
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Banks, S.P.
77908981-37bf-4d6a-a1e1-8549d26a61b7
Xu, X.
6da974fd-c59c-4388-8eaf-73017928017a
Banks, D.P.
293424e9-92eb-46f3-8871-40e8d3672b3c
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Banks, S.P.
77908981-37bf-4d6a-a1e1-8549d26a61b7

Xu, X., Banks, D.P., Eason, R.W. and Banks, S.P. (2009) Cellular modelling of the laser-induced forward transfer of micro - and nano-scale droplets. 5th International Congress on Laser Advanced Materials Processing (LAMP 2009), Japan. 28 Jun - 01 Jul 2009.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) [1] of micro- and nano-scale droplets is a relatively well-understood process experimentally [2,3]. By careful control of the applied laser fluence to just melt through a thin source film (the donor), it is possible to transfer single droplets of the film to a receiver substrate placed nearby. Such droplets can be micron [2] or sub-micron [3] in diameter and have potential applications in plasmonic devices. The process is inherently complex involving laser-induced phase changes (which may be non-thermal on femtosecond timescales), droplet growth from fluid flow in thin molten films, moving boundaries, and the flight dynamics of the droplet during transfer and upon impact at the receiver. At present, a complete model that encompasses all these different phenomena is still lacking. However, an approximate numerical model of the process would be highly desirable so that the various experimental parameters (laser fluence, donor thickness, donor-receiver separation etc.) can be optimised for minimum droplets sizes and close deposit spacing. One method of modelling highly complex processes is to use cellular automata [4]. In a cellular automaton, the spatial domain is split into a regular grid of cells whose states evolve in time according to a set of rules based on the states of neighbouring cells. An advantage of this technique for highly complex systems such as the LIFT of droplets is that rules which reproduce the behaviour of a system can be found without explicit derivation from the underlying physical equations.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 29 June 2009
Venue - Dates: 5th International Congress on Laser Advanced Materials Processing (LAMP 2009), Japan, 2009-06-28 - 2009-07-01
Related URLs:

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 79004
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/79004
PURE UUID: 5bdf05bb-f8a1-4179-bdad-41abdd2db8e6
ORCID for R.W. Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Mar 2010
Last modified: 30 Jan 2020 01:25

Export record

Contributors

Author: X. Xu
Author: D.P. Banks
Author: R.W. Eason ORCID iD
Author: S.P. Banks

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×