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Motions and crew responses on an offshore oil production and storage vessel

Motions and crew responses on an offshore oil production and storage vessel
Motions and crew responses on an offshore oil production and storage vessel
The motions of vessels may interfere with crew activities and well-being, but the relationships between motion and the experiences of crew are not well-established. Crew responses to motions of a floating production and storage offshore vessel at a fixed location in the North Sea were studied over a 5-month period to identify any changes in crew difficulties and symptoms associated with changes in vessel motion. Ship motions in all six axes (fore-aft, lateral, vertical, roll, pitch, and yaw) were recorded continuously over the 5-month period while 47 crew completed a total of 1704 daily diary entries, a participation rate of 66–78% of the crew complement. The dominant oscillations had frequencies of around 0.1 Hz, producing magnitudes of translational oscillation in accommodation areas of up to about 0.7 m s?2 r.m.s., depending on the weather, and magnitudes up to three times greater in some other areas. The daily diaries gave ratings of difficulties with tasks, effort level, motion sickness, health symptoms, fatigue, and sleep. Problems most strongly associated with vessel motions were difficulties with physical tasks (balancing, moving and carrying), and sleep problems. Physical and mental tiredness, cognitive aspects of task performance, and stomach awareness and dizziness were also strongly associated with motion magnitude. There was a vomiting incidence of 3.1%, compared with a predicted mean vomiting incidence of 9.3% for a mixed population of unadapted adults. It is concluded that crew difficulties increase on days when vessel motions increase, with some activities and responses particularly influenced by vessel motions.
0003-6870
904-914
Haward, Barbara M.
2f3de081-b1c9-49a5-83af-f7ead8997efd
Lewis, Christopher H.
ef327a9f-f6fd-4d1d-9576-20e544492d41
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Haward, Barbara M.
2f3de081-b1c9-49a5-83af-f7ead8997efd
Lewis, Christopher H.
ef327a9f-f6fd-4d1d-9576-20e544492d41
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Haward, Barbara M., Lewis, Christopher H. and Griffin, Michael J. (2009) Motions and crew responses on an offshore oil production and storage vessel. Applied Ergonomics, 40 (5), 904-914. (doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2009.01.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The motions of vessels may interfere with crew activities and well-being, but the relationships between motion and the experiences of crew are not well-established. Crew responses to motions of a floating production and storage offshore vessel at a fixed location in the North Sea were studied over a 5-month period to identify any changes in crew difficulties and symptoms associated with changes in vessel motion. Ship motions in all six axes (fore-aft, lateral, vertical, roll, pitch, and yaw) were recorded continuously over the 5-month period while 47 crew completed a total of 1704 daily diary entries, a participation rate of 66–78% of the crew complement. The dominant oscillations had frequencies of around 0.1 Hz, producing magnitudes of translational oscillation in accommodation areas of up to about 0.7 m s?2 r.m.s., depending on the weather, and magnitudes up to three times greater in some other areas. The daily diaries gave ratings of difficulties with tasks, effort level, motion sickness, health symptoms, fatigue, and sleep. Problems most strongly associated with vessel motions were difficulties with physical tasks (balancing, moving and carrying), and sleep problems. Physical and mental tiredness, cognitive aspects of task performance, and stomach awareness and dizziness were also strongly associated with motion magnitude. There was a vomiting incidence of 3.1%, compared with a predicted mean vomiting incidence of 9.3% for a mixed population of unadapted adults. It is concluded that crew difficulties increase on days when vessel motions increase, with some activities and responses particularly influenced by vessel motions.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 8 February 2009
Published date: September 2009
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 79047
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/79047
ISSN: 0003-6870
PURE UUID: 52a4781b-781e-45ad-81ee-9733c92ed16b
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Mar 2010
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:47

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Contributors

Author: Barbara M. Haward
Author: Christopher H. Lewis

University divisions

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