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Active control of flexural vibration: an adaptive anechoic termination

Active control of flexural vibration: an adaptive anechoic termination
Active control of flexural vibration: an adaptive anechoic termination
This paper describes an approach to the real-time, feedforward, adaptive broadband control of flexural vibrations of a beam. A wave interpretation is used: disturbance and control forces inject waves into the structure and the waves then propagate through it. The general aim is to implement an anechoic boundary to the structure which absorbs any energy incident upon it. Digital filters are implemented to estimate, in real-time, the amplitudes of the propagating waves incident on and reflected from the boundary by filtering the outputs of an array of sensors. The reflected wave is used as the cost function in a filtered-X LMS adaptive control. The feedforward reference signal used is either the primary disturbance or the incident wave — the former is rarely available outside the laboratory. Furthermore, for a finite, resonant structure, with potentially many modes in the frequency range of interest, the performance using the primary as a reference signal gives very poor performance due to the difficulty of approximating the resonant cancellation path. Control using the incident wave as a reference does not suffer from this problem. Experimental results are presented. Broadband attenuation of around 20 dB in the ratio of the reflected and incident powers is demonstrated experimentally. The effect on the input frequency response of the structure is that substantial damping is added to all the modes of vibration that lie within the broad frequency range of control: a reverberant structure becomes anechoic. The high frequency limit is caused by the delays in both the computational time and filtering phase lags. The adaptive system achieves significant attenuation for broadband incident disturbances.
978-1-4020-9437-8
231-240
Springer
Mace, B.R.
cfb883c3-2211-4f3a-b7f3-d5beb9baaefe
Rustighi, E.
9544ced4-5057-4491-a45c-643873dfed96
Ferguson, N.S.
8cb67e30-48e2-491c-9390-d444fa786ac8
Doherty, D.
ccb3b573-8390-4c57-984a-deee2795006c
Ulbrich, Heinz
Ginzinger, Lucas
Mace, B.R.
cfb883c3-2211-4f3a-b7f3-d5beb9baaefe
Rustighi, E.
9544ced4-5057-4491-a45c-643873dfed96
Ferguson, N.S.
8cb67e30-48e2-491c-9390-d444fa786ac8
Doherty, D.
ccb3b573-8390-4c57-984a-deee2795006c
Ulbrich, Heinz
Ginzinger, Lucas

Mace, B.R., Rustighi, E., Ferguson, N.S. and Doherty, D. (2009) Active control of flexural vibration: an adaptive anechoic termination. In, Ulbrich, Heinz and Ginzinger, Lucas (eds.) Motion and Vibration Control, Selected Papers from MOVIC 2008. MOVIC 2008: The 9th International Conference on Motion and Vibration Control (14/09/08 - 17/09/08) Dordrecht, NL. Springer, pp. 231-240. (doi:10.1007/978-1-4020-9438-5).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This paper describes an approach to the real-time, feedforward, adaptive broadband control of flexural vibrations of a beam. A wave interpretation is used: disturbance and control forces inject waves into the structure and the waves then propagate through it. The general aim is to implement an anechoic boundary to the structure which absorbs any energy incident upon it. Digital filters are implemented to estimate, in real-time, the amplitudes of the propagating waves incident on and reflected from the boundary by filtering the outputs of an array of sensors. The reflected wave is used as the cost function in a filtered-X LMS adaptive control. The feedforward reference signal used is either the primary disturbance or the incident wave — the former is rarely available outside the laboratory. Furthermore, for a finite, resonant structure, with potentially many modes in the frequency range of interest, the performance using the primary as a reference signal gives very poor performance due to the difficulty of approximating the resonant cancellation path. Control using the incident wave as a reference does not suffer from this problem. Experimental results are presented. Broadband attenuation of around 20 dB in the ratio of the reflected and incident powers is demonstrated experimentally. The effect on the input frequency response of the structure is that substantial damping is added to all the modes of vibration that lie within the broad frequency range of control: a reverberant structure becomes anechoic. The high frequency limit is caused by the delays in both the computational time and filtering phase lags. The adaptive system achieves significant attenuation for broadband incident disturbances.

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More information

Published date: 2009
Venue - Dates: MOVIC 2008: The 9th International Conference on Motion and Vibration Control, Munich, Germany, 2008-09-14 - 2008-09-17
Organisations: Dynamics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 79085
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/79085
ISBN: 978-1-4020-9437-8
PURE UUID: 4bf82d7f-b38e-406d-8c2a-c1b254dcced6
ORCID for B.R. Mace: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3312-4918
ORCID for E. Rustighi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9871-7795
ORCID for N.S. Ferguson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5955-7477

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Mar 2010
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:17

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Contributors

Author: B.R. Mace ORCID iD
Author: E. Rustighi ORCID iD
Author: N.S. Ferguson ORCID iD
Author: D. Doherty
Editor: Heinz Ulbrich
Editor: Lucas Ginzinger

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