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Impact of adiponectin and ghrelin on incident glucose tolerance and on weight change

Impact of adiponectin and ghrelin on incident glucose tolerance and on weight change
Impact of adiponectin and ghrelin on incident glucose tolerance and on weight change
Objectives: adiponectin and ghrelin are associated with adiposity and type 2 diabetes in several studies. We sought to prospectively determine the interaction of adiponectin and ghrelin in the development of adiposity and hyperglycaemia.
Design: prospective observational study.
Participants: 393 community-dwelling Afro-Jamaicans (mean age 47 ± 13 years; BMI 27·3 ± 6·3 kg/m2; 63% women) without glucose intolerance at baseline.
Measurements: anthropometry, fasting plasma glucose, 2-h plasma glucose, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin and ghrelin concentrations were measured at baseline and 4·1 ± 0·9 years later. Multivariate analyses were used to explore the associations of HOMA-IR, adiponectin and ghrelin with weight change and glycaemia.
Results: the mean weight change was 2·6 ± 5·5 kg. There were 114 incident cases of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 35 cases of diabetes mellitus. Adiponectin was positively correlated with age and female sex (P-values < 0·01). After adjusting for age and sex, adiponectin and ghrelin were significantly correlated with weight at baseline and follow-up. However, they were not associated with weight change even after further adjustment for baseline weight. Adiponectin, but not ghrelin, was associated with 2-h glucose concentrations at follow-up even after adjusting for age, sex, HOMA-IR and BMI (P = 0·04). In the fully adjusted logistic regression model, adiponectin predicted incident IGT (OR 0·93; 95% CI: 0·87–0·99) and attenuated the effect of BMI on incident IGT.
Conclusions: these longitudinal data show that adiponectin and ghrelin may not be causally involved in the development of obesity. However, adiponectin is independently associated with decreased risk of incident IGT
0300-0664
408-414
Bennett, Nadia R.
f6d69b41-5a3b-46ae-9ccc-810c338c207e
Boyne, Michael S.
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Cooper, Richard S.
2d5c12e7-239d-44bb-8a02-2ca07213bfed
Royal-Thomas, Tamika Y.
0a97fc43-3c99-4137-821a-5e65786ac874
Bennett, Franklyn L.
412ee771-23df-49ec-a649-358b9100658f
Luke, A.
9f8abff4-82e2-4466-b0a1-a1dabf7a3cfa
Wilks, Rainford J.
482ee1f5-160f-4a1c-b300-5dcbf323085b
Forrester, Terrence E.
d5ed0294-0713-4521-baf9-923f1cae5e7f
Bennett, Nadia R.
f6d69b41-5a3b-46ae-9ccc-810c338c207e
Boyne, Michael S.
7d787822-30fc-42e4-b3d4-8d3df98dfabd
Cooper, Richard S.
2d5c12e7-239d-44bb-8a02-2ca07213bfed
Royal-Thomas, Tamika Y.
0a97fc43-3c99-4137-821a-5e65786ac874
Bennett, Franklyn L.
412ee771-23df-49ec-a649-358b9100658f
Luke, A.
9f8abff4-82e2-4466-b0a1-a1dabf7a3cfa
Wilks, Rainford J.
482ee1f5-160f-4a1c-b300-5dcbf323085b
Forrester, Terrence E.
d5ed0294-0713-4521-baf9-923f1cae5e7f

Bennett, Nadia R., Boyne, Michael S., Cooper, Richard S., Royal-Thomas, Tamika Y., Bennett, Franklyn L., Luke, A., Wilks, Rainford J. and Forrester, Terrence E. (2009) Impact of adiponectin and ghrelin on incident glucose tolerance and on weight change. Clinical Endocrinology, 70 (3), 408-414. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2265.2008.03344.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: adiponectin and ghrelin are associated with adiposity and type 2 diabetes in several studies. We sought to prospectively determine the interaction of adiponectin and ghrelin in the development of adiposity and hyperglycaemia.
Design: prospective observational study.
Participants: 393 community-dwelling Afro-Jamaicans (mean age 47 ± 13 years; BMI 27·3 ± 6·3 kg/m2; 63% women) without glucose intolerance at baseline.
Measurements: anthropometry, fasting plasma glucose, 2-h plasma glucose, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin and ghrelin concentrations were measured at baseline and 4·1 ± 0·9 years later. Multivariate analyses were used to explore the associations of HOMA-IR, adiponectin and ghrelin with weight change and glycaemia.
Results: the mean weight change was 2·6 ± 5·5 kg. There were 114 incident cases of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 35 cases of diabetes mellitus. Adiponectin was positively correlated with age and female sex (P-values < 0·01). After adjusting for age and sex, adiponectin and ghrelin were significantly correlated with weight at baseline and follow-up. However, they were not associated with weight change even after further adjustment for baseline weight. Adiponectin, but not ghrelin, was associated with 2-h glucose concentrations at follow-up even after adjusting for age, sex, HOMA-IR and BMI (P = 0·04). In the fully adjusted logistic regression model, adiponectin predicted incident IGT (OR 0·93; 95% CI: 0·87–0·99) and attenuated the effect of BMI on incident IGT.
Conclusions: these longitudinal data show that adiponectin and ghrelin may not be causally involved in the development of obesity. However, adiponectin is independently associated with decreased risk of incident IGT

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Published date: March 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 79359
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/79359
ISSN: 0300-0664
PURE UUID: 75446d3a-18d9-4526-b29c-cc98ea3c34a4

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Date deposited: 15 Mar 2010
Last modified: 18 Oct 2017 16:32

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Contributors

Author: Nadia R. Bennett
Author: Michael S. Boyne
Author: Richard S. Cooper
Author: Tamika Y. Royal-Thomas
Author: Franklyn L. Bennett
Author: A. Luke
Author: Rainford J. Wilks
Author: Terrence E. Forrester

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