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Maternal vitamin B12 status in pregnancy Indian women and cognitive function in their 9-year old children

Maternal vitamin B12 status in pregnancy Indian women and cognitive function in their 9-year old children
Maternal vitamin B12 status in pregnancy Indian women and cognitive function in their 9-year old children
Background
Recent research has highlighted the influence of maternal factors on the health of the offspring. Intrauterine experiences may program metabolic, cardiovascular, and psychiatric disorders. We have shown that maternal vitamin B12 status affects adiposity and insulin resistance in the child. Vitamin B12 is important for brain development and function.
Objective
We investigated the relationship between maternal plasma vitamin B12 status during pregnancy and the child's cognitive function at 9 years of age.
Methods
We studied children born in the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study. Two groups of children were selected on the basis of maternal plasma vitamin B12 concentration at 28 weeks of gestation: group 1 (n = 49) included children of mothers with low plasma vitamin B12 (lowest decile, < 77 pM) and group 2 (n = 59) children of mothers with high plasma vitamin B12 (highest decile, > 224 pM).
Results
Children from group 1 performed more slowly than those from group 2 on the Color Trail A test (sustained attention, 182 vs. 159 seconds; p < .05) and the Digit Span Backward test (short-term memory, p <.05), after appropriate adjustment for confounders. There were no differences between group 1 and group 2 on other tests of cognitive function (intelligence, visual agnosia).
Conclusions
Maternal vitamin B12 status in pregnancy influences cognitive function in offspring.
maternal vitamin B12 status, offspring cognitive function, short-term memory, sustained attention
0379-5721
249-254
Bhate, Vidya
412b97c4-612a-486c-b550-aca58a7b263b
Deshpande, Swapna
42f4d734-9bfb-4b2a-86f6-c35321dc12e2
Bhat, Dattatray
2dcfc738-f249-4ee7-a61c-c91c964c9009
Joshi, Niranjan
edbd066c-a142-493e-83d8-db512a6c5bc9
Ladkat, Rasika
c41271d0-6420-4614-82dd-d263d4771a09
Watve, Sujala
bc13bb43-442b-4215-8d13-3043dd559cee
Fall, Caroline
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
de Jager, Celeste A.
64cddf59-682e-47bb-8b69-04a3d231bee1
Refsum, Helga
06e43672-b275-4a41-82af-ad539bd7effd
Yajnik, Chittaranjan
f5962976-1322-4c7e-860e-455a29396b4e
Bhate, Vidya
412b97c4-612a-486c-b550-aca58a7b263b
Deshpande, Swapna
42f4d734-9bfb-4b2a-86f6-c35321dc12e2
Bhat, Dattatray
2dcfc738-f249-4ee7-a61c-c91c964c9009
Joshi, Niranjan
edbd066c-a142-493e-83d8-db512a6c5bc9
Ladkat, Rasika
c41271d0-6420-4614-82dd-d263d4771a09
Watve, Sujala
bc13bb43-442b-4215-8d13-3043dd559cee
Fall, Caroline
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
de Jager, Celeste A.
64cddf59-682e-47bb-8b69-04a3d231bee1
Refsum, Helga
06e43672-b275-4a41-82af-ad539bd7effd
Yajnik, Chittaranjan
f5962976-1322-4c7e-860e-455a29396b4e

Bhate, Vidya, Deshpande, Swapna, Bhat, Dattatray, Joshi, Niranjan, Ladkat, Rasika, Watve, Sujala, Fall, Caroline, de Jager, Celeste A., Refsum, Helga and Yajnik, Chittaranjan (2008) Maternal vitamin B12 status in pregnancy Indian women and cognitive function in their 9-year old children. Food and Nutrition Bulletin, 29 (4), 249-254.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Recent research has highlighted the influence of maternal factors on the health of the offspring. Intrauterine experiences may program metabolic, cardiovascular, and psychiatric disorders. We have shown that maternal vitamin B12 status affects adiposity and insulin resistance in the child. Vitamin B12 is important for brain development and function.
Objective
We investigated the relationship between maternal plasma vitamin B12 status during pregnancy and the child's cognitive function at 9 years of age.
Methods
We studied children born in the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study. Two groups of children were selected on the basis of maternal plasma vitamin B12 concentration at 28 weeks of gestation: group 1 (n = 49) included children of mothers with low plasma vitamin B12 (lowest decile, < 77 pM) and group 2 (n = 59) children of mothers with high plasma vitamin B12 (highest decile, > 224 pM).
Results
Children from group 1 performed more slowly than those from group 2 on the Color Trail A test (sustained attention, 182 vs. 159 seconds; p < .05) and the Digit Span Backward test (short-term memory, p <.05), after appropriate adjustment for confounders. There were no differences between group 1 and group 2 on other tests of cognitive function (intelligence, visual agnosia).
Conclusions
Maternal vitamin B12 status in pregnancy influences cognitive function in offspring.

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More information

Published date: December 2008
Keywords: maternal vitamin B12 status, offspring cognitive function, short-term memory, sustained attention

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 79415
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/79415
ISSN: 0379-5721
PURE UUID: fbb0106b-84f1-44df-a758-3235936d3b17

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Date deposited: 15 Mar 2010
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:17

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Contributors

Author: Vidya Bhate
Author: Swapna Deshpande
Author: Dattatray Bhat
Author: Niranjan Joshi
Author: Rasika Ladkat
Author: Sujala Watve
Author: Caroline Fall
Author: Celeste A. de Jager
Author: Helga Refsum
Author: Chittaranjan Yajnik

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