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Material selection for optimal design of thermally actuated pneumatic and phase change microactuators

Material selection for optimal design of thermally actuated pneumatic and phase change microactuators
Material selection for optimal design of thermally actuated pneumatic and phase change microactuators
This paper discusses a methodology to select materials which deliver the best performance for thermally actuated pneumatic and phase change microactuators. The material selection is based on performance metrics estimated using simple closed form solutions for classical linear elastic theory for axisymmetric plates/membranes and lumped heat capacity thermal models. Although the elastic moduli of the diaphragm materials dictate the volume expansion for a given temperature rise, their influence on the achievable pressure difference is much less. It is found that engineering polymers are most suitable for thermopneumatically actuated diaphragms for delivering large displacements and work for the achievable pressures at frequencies of a few hundreds of Hertz. The membrane stresses due to in-plane pre-tension are found to have an adverse effect on the actuator performance. The material issues which constrain the performance limits of phase change actuators are also assessed, and the promising characteristics of paraffin waxes for microsystem applications are discussed.
1057-7157
239-249
Srinivasan, Prasanna
6d2ed223-82d0-4e1e-9a0d-734e3fb512b6
Spearing, Simon M
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a
Srinivasan, Prasanna
6d2ed223-82d0-4e1e-9a0d-734e3fb512b6
Spearing, Simon M
9e56a7b3-e0e8-47b1-a6b4-db676ed3c17a

Srinivasan, Prasanna and Spearing, Simon M (2009) Material selection for optimal design of thermally actuated pneumatic and phase change microactuators. Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, 18 (2), 239-249. (doi:10.1109/JMEMS.2009.2013385).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper discusses a methodology to select materials which deliver the best performance for thermally actuated pneumatic and phase change microactuators. The material selection is based on performance metrics estimated using simple closed form solutions for classical linear elastic theory for axisymmetric plates/membranes and lumped heat capacity thermal models. Although the elastic moduli of the diaphragm materials dictate the volume expansion for a given temperature rise, their influence on the achievable pressure difference is much less. It is found that engineering polymers are most suitable for thermopneumatically actuated diaphragms for delivering large displacements and work for the achievable pressures at frequencies of a few hundreds of Hertz. The membrane stresses due to in-plane pre-tension are found to have an adverse effect on the actuator performance. The material issues which constrain the performance limits of phase change actuators are also assessed, and the promising characteristics of paraffin waxes for microsystem applications are discussed.

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More information

Published date: April 2009
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 79462
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/79462
ISSN: 1057-7157
PURE UUID: 03ad244c-7a24-4dda-88af-cda6bfa4982b

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Date deposited: 16 Mar 2010
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:17

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