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Resuming previously valued activities post-stroke: who or what helps?

Resuming previously valued activities post-stroke: who or what helps?
Resuming previously valued activities post-stroke: who or what helps?
Purpose. In this article, we aim to develop the understanding of what helps or hinders resumption of valued activities up to 12-months post-stroke.

Method. As part of a longitudinal study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 people with stroke and eight informal carers 12-months post-stroke. Interviews covered ongoing effects of stroke, experience of trying to resume activities highlighted as important pre-stroke and factors that influenced progress. Interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed in depth to explore this aspect of the experience of living with stroke.

Results. Valued activities discussed related to employment; domestic and social roles including driving; hobbies, sports and socialising. Outcomes for individuals were influenced by: aspects of physical or cognitive disability; environmental factors; the adaptability of the individual; support from others and professional help. Inability to resume activities impacted on people's sense of self and quality of life, but some tolerated change and presented themselves as adaptable.

Conclusions. This study indicates a long-term role for rehabilitation services such as: identifying the significance of different types of activities; providing access to support and treatment for debilitating symptoms such as fatigue and dizziness; addressing patients' emotional and behavioural responses to their condition; working with patients' wider social networks and where appropriate, supporting adaptation to a changed way of life.

Stroke rehabilitation activity outcomes stroke, rehabilitation, activity, outcomes
0963-8288
1555-1566
Robison, J.
e39bf280-2265-431d-8935-0f528e99c812
Wiles, R.
5bdc597b-716c-4f60-9f45-631ecca25571
Ellis-Hill, C.
e1066987-f368-47e7-b746-92deb7d25ed9
McPherson, K.
dc901431-2119-42df-9400-852e4cb46d75
Hyndman, Dorit
6b6c65d5-1d03-4a13-9db8-1342cd43f352
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Robison, J.
e39bf280-2265-431d-8935-0f528e99c812
Wiles, R.
5bdc597b-716c-4f60-9f45-631ecca25571
Ellis-Hill, C.
e1066987-f368-47e7-b746-92deb7d25ed9
McPherson, K.
dc901431-2119-42df-9400-852e4cb46d75
Hyndman, Dorit
6b6c65d5-1d03-4a13-9db8-1342cd43f352
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991

Robison, J., Wiles, R., Ellis-Hill, C., McPherson, K., Hyndman, Dorit and Ashburn, A. (2009) Resuming previously valued activities post-stroke: who or what helps? Disability and Rehabilitation, 31 (19), 1555-1566. (doi:10.1080/09638280802639327).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose. In this article, we aim to develop the understanding of what helps or hinders resumption of valued activities up to 12-months post-stroke.

Method. As part of a longitudinal study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 people with stroke and eight informal carers 12-months post-stroke. Interviews covered ongoing effects of stroke, experience of trying to resume activities highlighted as important pre-stroke and factors that influenced progress. Interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed in depth to explore this aspect of the experience of living with stroke.

Results. Valued activities discussed related to employment; domestic and social roles including driving; hobbies, sports and socialising. Outcomes for individuals were influenced by: aspects of physical or cognitive disability; environmental factors; the adaptability of the individual; support from others and professional help. Inability to resume activities impacted on people's sense of self and quality of life, but some tolerated change and presented themselves as adaptable.

Conclusions. This study indicates a long-term role for rehabilitation services such as: identifying the significance of different types of activities; providing access to support and treatment for debilitating symptoms such as fatigue and dizziness; addressing patients' emotional and behavioural responses to their condition; working with patients' wider social networks and where appropriate, supporting adaptation to a changed way of life.

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More information

Published date: 2009
Keywords: Stroke rehabilitation activity outcomes stroke, rehabilitation, activity, outcomes

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 80148
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/80148
ISSN: 0963-8288
PURE UUID: 61fd9457-e293-4ecd-a302-18226a2f40be
ORCID for Dorit Hyndman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4449-1414

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Mar 2010
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:50

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Contributors

Author: J. Robison
Author: R. Wiles
Author: C. Ellis-Hill
Author: K. McPherson
Author: Dorit Hyndman ORCID iD
Author: A. Ashburn

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