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Through civil war, food crisis and drought: trends in fertility and nuptiality in post-Soviet Tajikistan

Through civil war, food crisis and drought: trends in fertility and nuptiality in post-Soviet Tajikistan
Through civil war, food crisis and drought: trends in fertility and nuptiality in post-Soviet Tajikistan
This article has two objectives. First, it aims to complement and extend existing research on post-socialist demographic change, which has thus far tended to focus on Central and Eastern Europe. It does this by describing the nature of post-Soviet trends in nuptiality and fertility in Tajikistan, the republic with the highest rate of population growth during the Soviet period. It finds evidence for a decrease in period fertility after independence: initially, through a decline at higher orders; then, through a significant decrease in the rate of first births, associated with a dramatic decrease in the rate of first union formation since the mid-1990s. Second, it aims to contribute to the demography of conflict and of food crisis. Most clearly, it finds strong evidence for a decrease in nuptiality and fertility associated with the 1995 food crisis
post soviet, central asia, tajikistan, fertility, union formation, civil war, food crisis
0168-6577
325-350
Clifford, David
9686f96b-3d0c-48d2-a694-00c87b536fde
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Hinde, Andrew
0691a8ab-dcdb-4694-93b4-40d5e71f672d
Clifford, David
9686f96b-3d0c-48d2-a694-00c87b536fde
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Hinde, Andrew
0691a8ab-dcdb-4694-93b4-40d5e71f672d

Clifford, David, Falkingham, Jane and Hinde, Andrew (2010) Through civil war, food crisis and drought: trends in fertility and nuptiality in post-Soviet Tajikistan. European Journal of Population, 26 (3), 325-350. (doi:10.1007/s10680-010-9206-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article has two objectives. First, it aims to complement and extend existing research on post-socialist demographic change, which has thus far tended to focus on Central and Eastern Europe. It does this by describing the nature of post-Soviet trends in nuptiality and fertility in Tajikistan, the republic with the highest rate of population growth during the Soviet period. It finds evidence for a decrease in period fertility after independence: initially, through a decline at higher orders; then, through a significant decrease in the rate of first births, associated with a dramatic decrease in the rate of first union formation since the mid-1990s. Second, it aims to contribute to the demography of conflict and of food crisis. Most clearly, it finds strong evidence for a decrease in nuptiality and fertility associated with the 1995 food crisis

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 17 February 2010
Keywords: post soviet, central asia, tajikistan, fertility, union formation, civil war, food crisis
Organisations: Statistics, Social Statistics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 80160
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/80160
ISSN: 0168-6577
PURE UUID: f1def9d1-3a49-418d-a121-1d94438f48c9
ORCID for David Clifford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5347-0706
ORCID for Jane Falkingham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7135-5875
ORCID for Andrew Hinde: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8909-9152

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Mar 2010
Last modified: 01 Oct 2019 01:01

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