The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Knowledge and collective preferences. A comparison of two approaches to estimating the opinions of a better informed public

Knowledge and collective preferences. A comparison of two approaches to estimating the opinions of a better informed public
Knowledge and collective preferences. A comparison of two approaches to estimating the opinions of a better informed public
This article compares estimates of "informed" public opinion derived from the regression-based approach of Bartels, Delli Carpini and Keeter, and Althaus with those from the deliberative polling method of Fishkin on the same sample of respondents. Contrary to low-information rationality perspectives, both methods indicate that across a range of prominent policy domains, level of political awareness has a strong impact on the expressed preferences of individuals. And while self-canceling across respondents tends to translate these individual-level influences into only rather modest effects in the aggregate, on a significant minority of issues, substantial shifts in collective opinion remain. The broad similarity of the estimates produced by these two very different methods, in addition to their convergence with previous studies of information effects, lends some simultaneous support to the validity and reliability of both approaches.

deliberative polling, public opinion, simulation modeling
0049-1241
453-485
Sturgis, Patrick
b9f6b40c-50d2-4117-805a-577b501d0b3c
Sturgis, Patrick
b9f6b40c-50d2-4117-805a-577b501d0b3c

Sturgis, Patrick (2003) Knowledge and collective preferences. A comparison of two approaches to estimating the opinions of a better informed public. Sociological Methods and Research, 31 (4), 453-485. (doi:10.1177/0049124103251949).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article compares estimates of "informed" public opinion derived from the regression-based approach of Bartels, Delli Carpini and Keeter, and Althaus with those from the deliberative polling method of Fishkin on the same sample of respondents. Contrary to low-information rationality perspectives, both methods indicate that across a range of prominent policy domains, level of political awareness has a strong impact on the expressed preferences of individuals. And while self-canceling across respondents tends to translate these individual-level influences into only rather modest effects in the aggregate, on a significant minority of issues, substantial shifts in collective opinion remain. The broad similarity of the estimates produced by these two very different methods, in addition to their convergence with previous studies of information effects, lends some simultaneous support to the validity and reliability of both approaches.

PDF
2003_Knowledge_and_collective_preferences_A_comparison_of_two_approaches.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 2003
Keywords: deliberative polling, public opinion, simulation modeling

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 80191
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/80191
ISSN: 0049-1241
PURE UUID: 66eeb34f-76c7-4bd3-af28-12527bd8658c
ORCID for Patrick Sturgis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1180-3493

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Mar 2010
Last modified: 15 Jan 2019 01:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Patrick Sturgis ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×