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The effects of extended interviewer effort on non-response bias

The effects of extended interviewer effort on non-response bias
The effects of extended interviewer effort on non-response bias
Though rarely stated explicitly, an important rationale for wanting to maximise response rate is an assumption that this will bring greater gains in accuracy of estimation than simply increasing the selected sample size. In other words, it is assumed that adding in hard-to-get respondents will not merely improve precision, but will reduce non-response bias. In this paper, we examine two distinct components of the difficulty of achieving an interview: difficulty of contacting sample members ("ease of contact") and difficulty of obtaining co-operation once contact is made ("reluctance to co-operate"). We assess the separate and combined effects of ease of contact and reluctance on nonresponse bias in order to estimate the impact of extended interviewer efforts on survey error and to answer subsidiary questions about the relative effectiveness of different types of extended efforts. Data come from the Family Resources Survey, Health Survey for England and British Social Attitudes Surveys.
0471396273
135-148
Wiley-Blackwell
Lynn, Peter
bd2d1d02-1a66-4454-bc04-175aec4886a0
Sturgis, Patrick
b9f6b40c-50d2-4117-805a-577b501d0b3c
Clarke, Paul
962f7c73-1c1e-4719-bfc4-9e5e8ac1fe9c
Martin, Jean
413614c2-5980-4ae8-94aa-fb53257d34be
Groves, Robert M.
Dillman, Don A.
Eltinge, John L.
Roderick, J.A. Little
Lynn, Peter
bd2d1d02-1a66-4454-bc04-175aec4886a0
Sturgis, Patrick
b9f6b40c-50d2-4117-805a-577b501d0b3c
Clarke, Paul
962f7c73-1c1e-4719-bfc4-9e5e8ac1fe9c
Martin, Jean
413614c2-5980-4ae8-94aa-fb53257d34be
Groves, Robert M.
Dillman, Don A.
Eltinge, John L.
Roderick, J.A. Little

Lynn, Peter, Sturgis, Patrick, Clarke, Paul and Martin, Jean (2001) The effects of extended interviewer effort on non-response bias. In, Groves, Robert M., Dillman, Don A., Eltinge, John L. and Roderick, J.A. Little (eds.) Survey Nonresponse. (Wiley Series in Survey Methodology) New York, US. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 135-148.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Though rarely stated explicitly, an important rationale for wanting to maximise response rate is an assumption that this will bring greater gains in accuracy of estimation than simply increasing the selected sample size. In other words, it is assumed that adding in hard-to-get respondents will not merely improve precision, but will reduce non-response bias. In this paper, we examine two distinct components of the difficulty of achieving an interview: difficulty of contacting sample members ("ease of contact") and difficulty of obtaining co-operation once contact is made ("reluctance to co-operate"). We assess the separate and combined effects of ease of contact and reluctance on nonresponse bias in order to estimate the impact of extended interviewer efforts on survey error and to answer subsidiary questions about the relative effectiveness of different types of extended efforts. Data come from the Family Resources Survey, Health Survey for England and British Social Attitudes Surveys.

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Published date: October 2001

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 80194
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/80194
ISBN: 0471396273
PURE UUID: 47bb36fe-fab8-4435-a3e1-85bb1900beef
ORCID for Patrick Sturgis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1180-3493

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Date deposited: 24 Mar 2010
Last modified: 10 Apr 2019 00:33

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