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Deep-water sedimentary systems: new models for the 21st century

Deep-water sedimentary systems: new models for the 21st century
Deep-water sedimentary systems: new models for the 21st century
One of the principal scientific, technical and environmental challenges for the next century is undoubtedly the exploration and understanding of the deep oceans. Close collaboration between the hydrocarbon industry and scientific community is allowing us to push back this frontier and so to develop new models for deep-water sedimentary systems. The turbidity current paradigm is under scrutiny and refinements proposed for massive sands, megabeds and immature turbidites. Source area and sediment type are key controls. Bottom currents play an important part in the shaping of margins, the generation of hiatuses and bounding surfaces, the winnowing of sands and ventilation of ocean basins. It is at the level of architectural elements and their three-dimensional geometry that much activity is currently focused. Most advance has so far been made in terms of channel types, dimensions, aspect ratios, stacking patterns and hierarchies; to a lesser extent this is true for lobes, levee complexes, contourite drifts and sheet sands. It is only after this phase of study that we will be able to significantly improve our models for the larger-scale systems—fans, ramps, slope-aprons, basin plains and drifts
DEEP WATER, SEDIMENTARY STRUCTURES, TURBIDITY CURRENTS, TURBIDITES, SEDIMENTS, CHANNELS
0264-8172
125-135
Stow, D.A.V.
434350cd-0ae5-4bb3-b71f-e1da90587f74
Mayall, M.
a6d7f1ab-b20b-40cd-b658-6f33460d6477
Stow, D.A.V.
434350cd-0ae5-4bb3-b71f-e1da90587f74
Mayall, M.
a6d7f1ab-b20b-40cd-b658-6f33460d6477

Stow, D.A.V. and Mayall, M. (2000) Deep-water sedimentary systems: new models for the 21st century. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 17 (2), 125-135. (doi:10.1016/S0264-8172(99)00064-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

One of the principal scientific, technical and environmental challenges for the next century is undoubtedly the exploration and understanding of the deep oceans. Close collaboration between the hydrocarbon industry and scientific community is allowing us to push back this frontier and so to develop new models for deep-water sedimentary systems. The turbidity current paradigm is under scrutiny and refinements proposed for massive sands, megabeds and immature turbidites. Source area and sediment type are key controls. Bottom currents play an important part in the shaping of margins, the generation of hiatuses and bounding surfaces, the winnowing of sands and ventilation of ocean basins. It is at the level of architectural elements and their three-dimensional geometry that much activity is currently focused. Most advance has so far been made in terms of channel types, dimensions, aspect ratios, stacking patterns and hierarchies; to a lesser extent this is true for lobes, levee complexes, contourite drifts and sheet sands. It is only after this phase of study that we will be able to significantly improve our models for the larger-scale systems—fans, ramps, slope-aprons, basin plains and drifts

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More information

Published date: 2000
Keywords: DEEP WATER, SEDIMENTARY STRUCTURES, TURBIDITY CURRENTS, TURBIDITES, SEDIMENTS, CHANNELS

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 8761
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/8761
ISSN: 0264-8172
PURE UUID: 386a34af-ab87-4cec-9488-1bed65db4df9

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Date deposited: 14 Sep 2004
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 17:12

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Contributors

Author: D.A.V. Stow
Author: M. Mayall

University divisions

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