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Mass balance of trace metals in the Adriatic Sea

Mass balance of trace metals in the Adriatic Sea
Mass balance of trace metals in the Adriatic Sea
A first order mass balance of six different trace metals (Mn, Fe, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni) was presented for a 1-year period for the different compartments of the Adriatic Sea: compartment 1 (northern Adriatic Sea), compartment 2 (central Adriatic Sea and surface layer of the southern Adriatic Sea) and compartment 3 (deep water of the southern Adriatic Sea). The Adriatic Sea appeared to be a source of dissolved Cu, Mn and Fe for the Mediterranean Sea through the Strait of Otranto whereas for dissolved Zn and Pb the Adriatic Sea appeared to be a net sink. For dissolved Ni, inputs and outputs through the Strait of Otranto balanced each other. The residence times of all metals in compartment 1 were significantly shorter than that of water indicating significant removal. In compartments 2 and 3, residence times of Mn and Fe were relatively short suggesting removal from the water column whereas for the other metals their residence times were similar to that of water. Calculations of turnover times of metals with respect to different processes showed that in compartments 1 and 2, sedimentation was the main process that affected the content of the reservoirs whereas in compartment 3, the water flux exchanges played an important role for Zn, Cu and Ni.
Most of the metals clearly undergo a very dynamic cycle of sedimentation/remobilization particularly in the Northern Adriatic Sea. In the northern Adriatic Sea, most of the Mn and Fe in deposited sediment were remobilized. This was related to diagenetic processes involving the utilisation and solubilisation of Mn and Fe oxides, which occur in the surface of the sediment in the northern Adriatic Sea. In the central Adriatic Sea, remobilization of Mn and Fe was less than in the northern Adriatic Sea, suggesting that diagenesis processes appear deeper in the sediment. Advective transport of sediment was a major source of metals for the deep basin. As much as 80% of the sediments in the South Adriatic Pit might be advected from the shelf. Remobilization fluxes in the South Adriatic Pit were significantly less than in the Northern and Central Adriatic Sea reflecting hemi-pelagic sediments.
RESIDENCE TIMES, DIAGENESIS, MANGANESE, IRON
0924-7963
269-286
Tankere, S.P.C.
f289457e-0cde-4be2-aa58-7075f5a57851
Price, N.B.
2b65b579-b8c2-4220-8290-b78e4bbf0810
Statham, P.J.
51458f15-d6e2-4231-8bba-d0567f9e440c
Tankere, S.P.C.
f289457e-0cde-4be2-aa58-7075f5a57851
Price, N.B.
2b65b579-b8c2-4220-8290-b78e4bbf0810
Statham, P.J.
51458f15-d6e2-4231-8bba-d0567f9e440c

Tankere, S.P.C., Price, N.B. and Statham, P.J. (2000) Mass balance of trace metals in the Adriatic Sea. Journal of Marine Systems, 25 (3/4), 269-286. (doi:10.1016/S0924-7963(00)00021-X).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A first order mass balance of six different trace metals (Mn, Fe, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni) was presented for a 1-year period for the different compartments of the Adriatic Sea: compartment 1 (northern Adriatic Sea), compartment 2 (central Adriatic Sea and surface layer of the southern Adriatic Sea) and compartment 3 (deep water of the southern Adriatic Sea). The Adriatic Sea appeared to be a source of dissolved Cu, Mn and Fe for the Mediterranean Sea through the Strait of Otranto whereas for dissolved Zn and Pb the Adriatic Sea appeared to be a net sink. For dissolved Ni, inputs and outputs through the Strait of Otranto balanced each other. The residence times of all metals in compartment 1 were significantly shorter than that of water indicating significant removal. In compartments 2 and 3, residence times of Mn and Fe were relatively short suggesting removal from the water column whereas for the other metals their residence times were similar to that of water. Calculations of turnover times of metals with respect to different processes showed that in compartments 1 and 2, sedimentation was the main process that affected the content of the reservoirs whereas in compartment 3, the water flux exchanges played an important role for Zn, Cu and Ni.
Most of the metals clearly undergo a very dynamic cycle of sedimentation/remobilization particularly in the Northern Adriatic Sea. In the northern Adriatic Sea, most of the Mn and Fe in deposited sediment were remobilized. This was related to diagenetic processes involving the utilisation and solubilisation of Mn and Fe oxides, which occur in the surface of the sediment in the northern Adriatic Sea. In the central Adriatic Sea, remobilization of Mn and Fe was less than in the northern Adriatic Sea, suggesting that diagenesis processes appear deeper in the sediment. Advective transport of sediment was a major source of metals for the deep basin. As much as 80% of the sediments in the South Adriatic Pit might be advected from the shelf. Remobilization fluxes in the South Adriatic Pit were significantly less than in the Northern and Central Adriatic Sea reflecting hemi-pelagic sediments.

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More information

Published date: 2000
Keywords: RESIDENCE TIMES, DIAGENESIS, MANGANESE, IRON

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 8835
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/8835
ISSN: 0924-7963
PURE UUID: fdeb3412-9bb7-4a60-ae64-82b74f91f448

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Date deposited: 13 Sep 2004
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 17:12

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