The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The mathematics of early diagenesis: from worms to waves

The mathematics of early diagenesis: from worms to waves
The mathematics of early diagenesis: from worms to waves
The changes that sediments undergo after deposition are collectively known as diagenesis. Diagenesis is not widely recognized as a source for mathematical ideas; however, the myriad processes responsible for these changes lead to a wide variety of mathematical models. In fact, most of the classical models and methods of applied mathematics emerge naturally from quantification of diagenesis. For example, small-scale sediment mixing by bottom-dwelling animals can be described by the diffusion equation; the dissolution of biogenic opal in sediments leads to sets of coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations; and modeling organisms that eat at depth in the sediment and defecate at the surface suggests the one-dimensional wave equation, while the effect of waves on pore waters is governed by the two- or three-dimensional wave equation. Diagenetic modeling, however, is not restricted to classical methods. Diagenetic problems of concern to modern mathematics exist in abundance; these include free-boundary problems that predict the depth of biological mixing or the penetration of O2 into sediments, algebraic-differential equations that result from the fast-reversible reactions that regulate pH in pore waters, inverse calculations of input functions (histories), and the determination of the optimum choice in a hierarchy of possible diagenetic models. This review highlights and explores these topics with the hope of encouraging further modeling and analysis of diagenetic phenomena.
DIAGENESIS, MATHEMATICAL MODELLING
389-416
Boudreau, B.P.
b32c0db6-4c4e-4a6d-be0d-990bfe4b43c5
Boudreau, B.P.
b32c0db6-4c4e-4a6d-be0d-990bfe4b43c5

Boudreau, B.P. (2000) The mathematics of early diagenesis: from worms to waves. Reviews of Geophysics, 38 (3), 389-416.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The changes that sediments undergo after deposition are collectively known as diagenesis. Diagenesis is not widely recognized as a source for mathematical ideas; however, the myriad processes responsible for these changes lead to a wide variety of mathematical models. In fact, most of the classical models and methods of applied mathematics emerge naturally from quantification of diagenesis. For example, small-scale sediment mixing by bottom-dwelling animals can be described by the diffusion equation; the dissolution of biogenic opal in sediments leads to sets of coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations; and modeling organisms that eat at depth in the sediment and defecate at the surface suggests the one-dimensional wave equation, while the effect of waves on pore waters is governed by the two- or three-dimensional wave equation. Diagenetic modeling, however, is not restricted to classical methods. Diagenetic problems of concern to modern mathematics exist in abundance; these include free-boundary problems that predict the depth of biological mixing or the penetration of O2 into sediments, algebraic-differential equations that result from the fast-reversible reactions that regulate pH in pore waters, inverse calculations of input functions (histories), and the determination of the optimum choice in a hierarchy of possible diagenetic models. This review highlights and explores these topics with the hope of encouraging further modeling and analysis of diagenetic phenomena.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2000
Keywords: DIAGENESIS, MATHEMATICAL MODELLING

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 8837
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/8837
PURE UUID: 034de170-f65c-4ddb-a331-a2c495d99a0f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Sep 2004
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 17:12

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×