The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Temperature and pressure tolerances of embryos and larvae of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri (Echinodermata: Echinoidea): potential for deep-sea invasion from high latitudes

Temperature and pressure tolerances of embryos and larvae of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri (Echinodermata: Echinoidea): potential for deep-sea invasion from high latitudes
Temperature and pressure tolerances of embryos and larvae of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri (Echinodermata: Echinoidea): potential for deep-sea invasion from high latitudes
Early embryos, blastulae, prisms and 4-arm plutei of the Antarctic shallow-water echinoid Sterechinus neumayeri were subjected to a temperature/pressure regime from -1.2 to +2.5°C and from 1 to 250 atm. Early embryos were able to tolerate pressures up to 150 atm at +2.5 to +0.9°C and 100 atm at -1.2°C. Blastulae and prisms showed an increasing sensitivity to pressure with decreasing temperature. Four-arm plutei were more sensitive than early larval stages to pressure and were also more sensitive to pressure at lower temperatures. These data suggest that the embryonic and larval stages of S. neumayeri are capable of surviving low temperatures in surface waters, but only tolerate higher pressures when water column temperatures are >0°C. Such a pattern of temperature increase is seen in the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water in the Weddell Sea and we infer that the larvae of S. neumayeri are capable of penetrating the deep sea through the agency of this deep water formation.
SEA URCHINS, EMBRYOS, LARVAE, DEEP WATER, TEMPERATURE TOLERANCE, PRESSURE TOLERANCE
0171-8630
173-180
Tyler, P.A.
d1965388-38cc-4c1d-9217-d59dba4dd7f8
Young, C.M.
0c561acc-0a69-4fd7-9457-08523d2e00b2
Clarke, A.
b31fc15c-f640-42d9-a8f0-fc9852109164
Tyler, P.A.
d1965388-38cc-4c1d-9217-d59dba4dd7f8
Young, C.M.
0c561acc-0a69-4fd7-9457-08523d2e00b2
Clarke, A.
b31fc15c-f640-42d9-a8f0-fc9852109164

Tyler, P.A., Young, C.M. and Clarke, A. (2000) Temperature and pressure tolerances of embryos and larvae of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri (Echinodermata: Echinoidea): potential for deep-sea invasion from high latitudes. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 192, 173-180.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Early embryos, blastulae, prisms and 4-arm plutei of the Antarctic shallow-water echinoid Sterechinus neumayeri were subjected to a temperature/pressure regime from -1.2 to +2.5°C and from 1 to 250 atm. Early embryos were able to tolerate pressures up to 150 atm at +2.5 to +0.9°C and 100 atm at -1.2°C. Blastulae and prisms showed an increasing sensitivity to pressure with decreasing temperature. Four-arm plutei were more sensitive than early larval stages to pressure and were also more sensitive to pressure at lower temperatures. These data suggest that the embryonic and larval stages of S. neumayeri are capable of surviving low temperatures in surface waters, but only tolerate higher pressures when water column temperatures are >0°C. Such a pattern of temperature increase is seen in the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water in the Weddell Sea and we infer that the larvae of S. neumayeri are capable of penetrating the deep sea through the agency of this deep water formation.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2000
Keywords: SEA URCHINS, EMBRYOS, LARVAE, DEEP WATER, TEMPERATURE TOLERANCE, PRESSURE TOLERANCE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 8957
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/8957
ISSN: 0171-8630
PURE UUID: 95b68862-68b5-4ec1-8a3c-00dd108a3bb2

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Sep 2004
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 17:12

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×