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A simulation methodology for continuous systems

A simulation methodology for continuous systems
A simulation methodology for continuous systems
This paper discusses the problem of modelling a continuous supply chain efficiently. Some existing modelling systems have poor performance, severely limiting their utility. The core of this work is the design, implementation and testing of a more efficient computational pattern that is claimed to improve performance. While the problem is apparently continuous, analysis suggests that this problem can be modelled using an adaption of discrete techniques. A pattern involving a modification of the Three Phase Approach discrete-event simulation technique was developed. Analysis of the way in which the effects of an event spread within the system modelled leads to a method by which excessive re-calculation can be avoided, yielding a model that is computationally more efficient. The pattern is then used in the investigation of automated design of the structure of the supply chain. The production, processing, transportation and consumption of Liquid National Gas (LNG) and the associated products form a complex supply chain and were selected as the example problem to be the subject of this work. The results demonstrate a high level of performance – sufficient speed to make experimentation with supply chain structure problems, with a real world level of complexity, practical.
Stchedroff, Niels
04e5abde-7406-468f-832c-52481c0e6ba5
Stchedroff, Niels
04e5abde-7406-468f-832c-52481c0e6ba5
Potts, Christopher
58c36fe5-3bcb-4320-a018-509844d4ccff

Stchedroff, Niels (2010) A simulation methodology for continuous systems. University of Southampton, School of Mathematics, Masters Thesis, 126pp.

Record type: Thesis (Masters)

Abstract

This paper discusses the problem of modelling a continuous supply chain efficiently. Some existing modelling systems have poor performance, severely limiting their utility. The core of this work is the design, implementation and testing of a more efficient computational pattern that is claimed to improve performance. While the problem is apparently continuous, analysis suggests that this problem can be modelled using an adaption of discrete techniques. A pattern involving a modification of the Three Phase Approach discrete-event simulation technique was developed. Analysis of the way in which the effects of an event spread within the system modelled leads to a method by which excessive re-calculation can be avoided, yielding a model that is computationally more efficient. The pattern is then used in the investigation of automated design of the structure of the supply chain. The production, processing, transportation and consumption of Liquid National Gas (LNG) and the associated products form a complex supply chain and were selected as the example problem to be the subject of this work. The results demonstrate a high level of performance – sufficient speed to make experimentation with supply chain structure problems, with a real world level of complexity, practical.

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Published date: September 2010
Organisations: University of Southampton

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Local EPrints ID: 167477
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/167477
PURE UUID: 19ac6ab4-1aa3-43fb-9332-f58831f71df1

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Date deposited: 25 Nov 2010 16:28
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:24

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