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Directed assembly of functional patterns

Directed assembly of functional patterns
Directed assembly of functional patterns
A multidisciplinary research network, namely CHELLnet, was founded to investigate novel research approaches to chemical cellularity and complexity. The synthesis of artificial chemical systems (not based on biological components) showing life-like behaviour represented the unifying target for the various subprojects.

The BrainCHELL project (or Directed Assembly of Functional Patterns, DAFP) aimed at developing multichannel, high sensitivity, electrical testing apparatus for the study of micro-scale, network-like, assemblies of various organic and hybrid materials. A multiple microelectrode array (MMEA) specifically designed for in-plane conductivity studies was used as the physical substrate for assembly, characterization, and reconfiguration experiments. Various nanomaterials were employed as the building blocks in the assembly procedures, with a focus on nanowires: 1) molecular wires (MWs) with oligophenyleneethynylenic (OPE) backbone were produced by organic synthesis methods and used for the interfacial assembly of MWs/NPs hybrid thin films; 2) conducting polymer (CP) polyethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) micro- and nanowires were electrochemically generated in-situ; 3) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) assemblies were produced both in-situ via dielectrophoretic assembly and ex-situ via interfacial assembly; 4) MWNTs/PEDOT hybrid assemblies were produced both in-situ and ex-situ; 5) MWNTs/NPs assemblies were produced ex-situ. Two multichannel systems suitable for automated low-level electrical testing (nA and pA level current measurement) have been developed and used to demonstrate anisotropic conductivity and reconfigurability in networks of organic and hybrid nanomaterials, laying the basis for further development of the system. A versatile experimental platform for molecular and nanoelectronics research is presented.
Giustiniano, Francesco
f2692f6a-8f0a-49de-aa5d-7c2dff402545
Giustiniano, Francesco
f2692f6a-8f0a-49de-aa5d-7c2dff402545
Whitby, R.J.
45632236-ab00-4ad0-a02d-6209043e818b

Giustiniano, Francesco (2010) Directed assembly of functional patterns. University of Southampton, School of Chemistry, Doctoral Thesis, 176pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

A multidisciplinary research network, namely CHELLnet, was founded to investigate novel research approaches to chemical cellularity and complexity. The synthesis of artificial chemical systems (not based on biological components) showing life-like behaviour represented the unifying target for the various subprojects.

The BrainCHELL project (or Directed Assembly of Functional Patterns, DAFP) aimed at developing multichannel, high sensitivity, electrical testing apparatus for the study of micro-scale, network-like, assemblies of various organic and hybrid materials. A multiple microelectrode array (MMEA) specifically designed for in-plane conductivity studies was used as the physical substrate for assembly, characterization, and reconfiguration experiments. Various nanomaterials were employed as the building blocks in the assembly procedures, with a focus on nanowires: 1) molecular wires (MWs) with oligophenyleneethynylenic (OPE) backbone were produced by organic synthesis methods and used for the interfacial assembly of MWs/NPs hybrid thin films; 2) conducting polymer (CP) polyethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) micro- and nanowires were electrochemically generated in-situ; 3) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) assemblies were produced both in-situ via dielectrophoretic assembly and ex-situ via interfacial assembly; 4) MWNTs/PEDOT hybrid assemblies were produced both in-situ and ex-situ; 5) MWNTs/NPs assemblies were produced ex-situ. Two multichannel systems suitable for automated low-level electrical testing (nA and pA level current measurement) have been developed and used to demonstrate anisotropic conductivity and reconfigurability in networks of organic and hybrid nanomaterials, laying the basis for further development of the system. A versatile experimental platform for molecular and nanoelectronics research is presented.

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Published date: 31 March 2010
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 191341
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/191341
PURE UUID: 4c5c90a0-49af-47f8-8698-1347388548a0
ORCID for Francesco Giustiniano: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9277-8538
ORCID for R.J. Whitby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9891-5502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Jun 2011 14:44
Last modified: 30 Jan 2020 01:35

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