The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Boundary element methods in structural dynamic system problems

Boundary element methods in structural dynamic system problems
Boundary element methods in structural dynamic system problems
The aim of the boundary element method (BEM) is the numerical solution of integral equations derived from various mathematical models of material behaviour. It is desirable that only the variation of unknown quantities over the boundary of the analysed medium appear in those equations so that only boundary meshing and modelling schemes would be required. Hence, no approximations are necessary for the variables within the domain and the dimensionality of the problem is reduced by one. Both the direct as well as the indirect versions of BEM use as weighting functions in the formulation and numerical integration process the fundamental solution of the linear field equations governing the physical problem under consideration. Thus, the method is particularly effective in modelling and analysing unbounded regions since then it permits the discretization of only internal boundaries and, in the case of wave propagation, incorporates the radiation condition at infinity.
9056996436
97-147
Chemical Rubber Company
Syngellakis, S.
1607c57d-5ed1-401c-bbec-92dc330462ea
Leondes, Cornelius T.
Syngellakis, S.
1607c57d-5ed1-401c-bbec-92dc330462ea
Leondes, Cornelius T.

Syngellakis, S. (1998) Boundary element methods in structural dynamic system problems. In, Leondes, Cornelius T. (ed.) Structural Dynamic Systems Computational Techniques and Optimization: Finite Element Analysis (FEA) Techniques. (Gordon and Breach International Series in Engineering, Technology and Applied Science) London, UK. Chemical Rubber Company, pp. 97-147.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The aim of the boundary element method (BEM) is the numerical solution of integral equations derived from various mathematical models of material behaviour. It is desirable that only the variation of unknown quantities over the boundary of the analysed medium appear in those equations so that only boundary meshing and modelling schemes would be required. Hence, no approximations are necessary for the variables within the domain and the dimensionality of the problem is reduced by one. Both the direct as well as the indirect versions of BEM use as weighting functions in the formulation and numerical integration process the fundamental solution of the linear field equations governing the physical problem under consideration. Thus, the method is particularly effective in modelling and analysing unbounded regions since then it permits the discretization of only internal boundaries and, in the case of wave propagation, incorporates the radiation condition at infinity.

Text
syng_98b.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (5MB)

More information

Published date: 1998

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 21184
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/21184
ISBN: 9056996436
PURE UUID: 6537f4ee-3e6b-4510-94d2-ed714f6178d4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Nov 2006
Last modified: 22 Jul 2020 16:39

Export record

Contributors

Author: S. Syngellakis
Editor: Cornelius T. Leondes

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×