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Advances in Automatic Gait Recognition

Advances in Automatic Gait Recognition
Advances in Automatic Gait Recognition
Automatic recognition by gait is subject to increasing interest and has the unique capability to recognize people at a distance when other biometrics are obscured. Its interest is reinforced by the longstanding computer vision interest in automated non-invasive analysis of human motion. Its recognition capability is supported by studies in other domains such as medicine (biomechanics), mathematics and psychology which continue to suggest that gait is unique. Further, examples of recognition by gait can be found in literature, with early reference by Shakespeare concerning recognition by the way people walk. Current approaches confirm the early results that suggested gait could be used for identification, and now on much larger databases. This has been especially influenced by the Human ID at a Distance research program with its wide scenario of data and approaches. Gait has benefited from the developments in other biometrics and has led to new insight particularly in view of covariates. As such, gait is an interesting research area, with contributions not only to the field of biometrics but also to the stock of new techniques for the extraction and description of objects moving within image sequences.
Gait, Biometrics
11-16
Nixon, M. S.
2b5b9804-5a81-462a-82e6-92ee5fa74e12
Carter, J. N.
e05be2f9-991d-4476-bb50-ae91606389da
Nixon, M. S.
2b5b9804-5a81-462a-82e6-92ee5fa74e12
Carter, J. N.
e05be2f9-991d-4476-bb50-ae91606389da

Nixon, M. S. and Carter, J. N. (2004) Advances in Automatic Gait Recognition. IEEE Face and Gesture Analysis 2004, FG04. pp. 11-16 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Automatic recognition by gait is subject to increasing interest and has the unique capability to recognize people at a distance when other biometrics are obscured. Its interest is reinforced by the longstanding computer vision interest in automated non-invasive analysis of human motion. Its recognition capability is supported by studies in other domains such as medicine (biomechanics), mathematics and psychology which continue to suggest that gait is unique. Further, examples of recognition by gait can be found in literature, with early reference by Shakespeare concerning recognition by the way people walk. Current approaches confirm the early results that suggested gait could be used for identification, and now on much larger databases. This has been especially influenced by the Human ID at a Distance research program with its wide scenario of data and approaches. Gait has benefited from the developments in other biometrics and has led to new insight particularly in view of covariates. As such, gait is an interesting research area, with contributions not only to the field of biometrics but also to the stock of new techniques for the extraction and description of objects moving within image sequences.

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More information

Published date: 2004
Additional Information: Event Dates: 2004
Venue - Dates: IEEE Face and Gesture Analysis 2004, FG04, 2004-01-01
Keywords: Gait, Biometrics
Organisations: Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 260069
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/260069
PURE UUID: 029349f3-fe61-4012-b1c8-ef4eb93ce5be
ORCID for M. S. Nixon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9174-5934

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Oct 2004
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 00:57

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