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Computer Based Training of Surgeons

Computer Based Training of Surgeons
Computer Based Training of Surgeons
AIMS: Training surgeons benefit from computer based simulation in a similar way to the training of pilots. Using video material in simulation ensures high visual quality, so enhancing pattern recognition training. OBJECTIVES: A pilot study proved the concept of using the simulator for the training of specialised ‘keyhole’ surgical skills. METHODS OF STUDY: The use of the motion sensor allows the surgical trainee to navigate through the body cavity enabling psychomotor training. The results of the pilot study compare the track of the trainees path with those of an expert, building a database which will allow comparison of an individual’s surgical performance, compared with a benchmark. Ultimately the performance of simulators themselves can be compared, once the performance of certain skills performed by the average surgeon is quantified. RESULTS: 20 trainee surgeons have been trained using the simulator. They provided subjective reports upon the experience and data for comparison in the evolving ‘performance database’. This is reported. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical simulation is an effective adjunct to conventional training. It allows both the development and reinforcement of primary surgical skills in a safe environment. Quantitative assessment of performance is possible, and central data collection will enhance statistical analysis in the future.
Surgical Training
Grange, S
e089a3d8-1552-45bf-a886-c2e9f2d1f882
Cooper, J
e755699a-8bfb-40a1-98f1-b5d3d0ae82e5
Jones, G
35e34a91-70c9-438a-931b-603a0a9f6ece
Bunker, TD
2c042945-8c6e-4bfd-876e-da3da302d145
Grange, S
e089a3d8-1552-45bf-a886-c2e9f2d1f882
Cooper, J
e755699a-8bfb-40a1-98f1-b5d3d0ae82e5
Jones, G
35e34a91-70c9-438a-931b-603a0a9f6ece
Bunker, TD
2c042945-8c6e-4bfd-876e-da3da302d145

(1999) Computer Based Training of Surgeons. Postgraduate Medical & Dental Training Consefernce 1999.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

AIMS: Training surgeons benefit from computer based simulation in a similar way to the training of pilots. Using video material in simulation ensures high visual quality, so enhancing pattern recognition training. OBJECTIVES: A pilot study proved the concept of using the simulator for the training of specialised ‘keyhole’ surgical skills. METHODS OF STUDY: The use of the motion sensor allows the surgical trainee to navigate through the body cavity enabling psychomotor training. The results of the pilot study compare the track of the trainees path with those of an expert, building a database which will allow comparison of an individual’s surgical performance, compared with a benchmark. Ultimately the performance of simulators themselves can be compared, once the performance of certain skills performed by the average surgeon is quantified. RESULTS: 20 trainee surgeons have been trained using the simulator. They provided subjective reports upon the experience and data for comparison in the evolving ‘performance database’. This is reported. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical simulation is an effective adjunct to conventional training. It allows both the development and reinforcement of primary surgical skills in a safe environment. Quantitative assessment of performance is possible, and central data collection will enhance statistical analysis in the future.

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More information

Published date: 1999
Additional Information: Event Dates: June 1999
Venue - Dates: Postgraduate Medical & Dental Training Consefernce 1999, 1999-06-01
Keywords: Surgical Training
Organisations: Electronic & Software Systems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 263658
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/263658
PURE UUID: e7d3c23e-b329-44ff-8b5c-7be4ebcce4fe

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Date deposited: 06 Mar 2007
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 07:43

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