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A Hierarchical Bayesian Trust Model based on Reputation and Group Behaviour

A Hierarchical Bayesian Trust Model based on Reputation and Group Behaviour
A Hierarchical Bayesian Trust Model based on Reputation and Group Behaviour
In many systems, agents must rely on their peers to achieve their goals. However, when trusted to perform an action, an agent may betray that trust by not behaving as required. Agents must therefore estimate the behaviour of their peers, so that they may identify reliable interaction partners. To this end, we present a Bayesian trust model (HABIT) for assessing trust based on direct experience and (potentially unreliable) reputation. Although existing approaches claim to achieve this, most rely on heuristics with little theoretical foundation. In contrast, HABIT is based on principled statistical techniques; can be used with any representation of behaviour; and can assess trust based on observed similarities between groups of agents. In this paper, we describe the theoretical aspects of the model and present experimental results in which HABIT was shown to be up to twice as accurate at predicting trustee performance as an existing state-of-the-art trust model.
trust, reputation, multiagent systems, probabilistic trust
Teacy, W. T. Luke
5f962a10-9ab5-4b19-8016-cc72588bdc6a
Jennings, Nicholas R.
ab3d94cc-247c-4545-9d1e-65873d6cdb30
Rogers, Alex
f9130bc6-da32-474e-9fab-6c6cb8077fdc
Luck, Michael
94f6044f-6353-4730-842a-0334318e6123
Teacy, W. T. Luke
5f962a10-9ab5-4b19-8016-cc72588bdc6a
Jennings, Nicholas R.
ab3d94cc-247c-4545-9d1e-65873d6cdb30
Rogers, Alex
f9130bc6-da32-474e-9fab-6c6cb8077fdc
Luck, Michael
94f6044f-6353-4730-842a-0334318e6123

Teacy, W. T. Luke, Jennings, Nicholas R., Rogers, Alex and Luck, Michael (2008) A Hierarchical Bayesian Trust Model based on Reputation and Group Behaviour. 6th European Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems, United Kingdom. 18 - 19 Dec 2008.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In many systems, agents must rely on their peers to achieve their goals. However, when trusted to perform an action, an agent may betray that trust by not behaving as required. Agents must therefore estimate the behaviour of their peers, so that they may identify reliable interaction partners. To this end, we present a Bayesian trust model (HABIT) for assessing trust based on direct experience and (potentially unreliable) reputation. Although existing approaches claim to achieve this, most rely on heuristics with little theoretical foundation. In contrast, HABIT is based on principled statistical techniques; can be used with any representation of behaviour; and can assess trust based on observed similarities between groups of agents. In this paper, we describe the theoretical aspects of the model and present experimental results in which HABIT was shown to be up to twice as accurate at predicting trustee performance as an existing state-of-the-art trust model.

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More information

Published date: December 2008
Additional Information: Event Dates: 18th-19th December, 2008
Venue - Dates: 6th European Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems, United Kingdom, 2008-12-18 - 2008-12-19
Keywords: trust, reputation, multiagent systems, probabilistic trust
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 266836
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/266836
PURE UUID: 3e9306de-5f93-4c8c-8f4d-92787c262af3

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Date deposited: 27 Oct 2008 15:16
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 07:11

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