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Frequency Domain Modeling of High Voltage Transformers Using a Nonlinear Least-Square Estimation Technique

Frequency Domain Modeling of High Voltage Transformers Using a Nonlinear Least-Square Estimation Technique
Frequency Domain Modeling of High Voltage Transformers Using a Nonlinear Least-Square Estimation Technique
The development of transformer models can be achieved based on experimental frequency response measurements providing access to the windings is available and the physical dimensions are known in order to calculate R, L and C parameter values. Of interest are methods that allow the generation of a suitable model if the R, L and C parameters are unknown and access is restricted to the external terminals of the winding only. Using a lumped parameter model and the measured frequency response across the whole winding, it is possible to estimate the intermediary winding responses. Knowledge of the intermediary winding frequency responses facilitates the development of condition monitoring tools that are capable of locating the source of partial discharge activity or winding deformation within a faulty transformer [1]. This paper includes a full description of the developed modeling technique, along with experimental results from a model winding system that validates the proposed approach.
978-0-620-44585-6
297-302
Mohamed, R
541bddba-9997-4f3f-a82a-3e055c173974
Lewin, P L
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Mohamed, R
541bddba-9997-4f3f-a82a-3e055c173974
Lewin, P L
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e

Mohamed, R and Lewin, P L (2009) Frequency Domain Modeling of High Voltage Transformers Using a Nonlinear Least-Square Estimation Technique. 16th International Symposium on High Voltage Engineering, South Africa. 24 - 28 Aug 2009. pp. 297-302 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The development of transformer models can be achieved based on experimental frequency response measurements providing access to the windings is available and the physical dimensions are known in order to calculate R, L and C parameter values. Of interest are methods that allow the generation of a suitable model if the R, L and C parameters are unknown and access is restricted to the external terminals of the winding only. Using a lumped parameter model and the measured frequency response across the whole winding, it is possible to estimate the intermediary winding responses. Knowledge of the intermediary winding frequency responses facilitates the development of condition monitoring tools that are capable of locating the source of partial discharge activity or winding deformation within a faulty transformer [1]. This paper includes a full description of the developed modeling technique, along with experimental results from a model winding system that validates the proposed approach.

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More information

Published date: 24 August 2009
Additional Information: Event Dates: 24-28 August 2009
Venue - Dates: 16th International Symposium on High Voltage Engineering, South Africa, 2009-08-24 - 2009-08-28
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 267818
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/267818
ISBN: 978-0-620-44585-6
PURE UUID: eba1955a-ba2d-4dcf-9f79-4a941b41f7b3

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Date deposited: 02 Sep 2009 13:35
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:59

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Contributors

Author: R Mohamed
Author: P L Lewin

University divisions

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