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Stroke Rehabilitation using Learning Control Mediated by Electrical Stimulation

Stroke Rehabilitation using Learning Control Mediated by Electrical Stimulation
Stroke Rehabilitation using Learning Control Mediated by Electrical Stimulation
Many people have problems with using their arm after a stroke, which can affect their ability to perform activities like reaching out to pick an object up. Over the last few years new technologies which use robots and electrical stimulation (ES) of muscles have been used to help with these problems. We have developed a new system which employs both of these technologies in conjunction with a technique called “Iterative Learning Control” (ILC) to help people recover movement in their arm. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ILC mediated by ES is a plausible intervention in upper limb stroke rehabilitation. Five hemiparetic participants with reduced upper limb function were asked to move their arm to track a slowing moving dot of light. This was for planar motion, replicating reaching out to an object across a table top. The participants’ arm was supported by the robot and ES was applied to the triceps brachii muscle. During each training task, the same tracking movement was repeated 6 times. After each repetition, ILC was used to compute the amount of stimulation (amplitude and timing) to be applied to the muscle on the next trial by incorporating data from previous trials of the task. Participants undertook 18 or 25, 1hour treatment sessions composed of training tasks varying in length, orientation and speed. Unassisted tracking (no ES supplied) was undertaken pre and post each treatment session. The Action Research Arm Test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) test were administered pre and post all treatment sessions. Significant improvements were found in 3 of 4 unassisted tracking tasks. FMA results also showed an improvement (although this was not clinically relevant). Thus, this study has shown feasibility in using ILC mediated ES for upper limb rehabilitation.
Meadmore, Katie L.
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Hughes, Anne-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Cai, Zhonglun
dd8dd525-19a5-4792-a048-617340996afe
Tong, Daisy
a956f1fa-832c-405e-ac5a-8b8aca6e1ea0
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Burridge, Jane
7c453775-c3ae-4d55-99af-2ed8600ca680
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72
Meadmore, Katie L.
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Hughes, Anne-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Cai, Zhonglun
dd8dd525-19a5-4792-a048-617340996afe
Tong, Daisy
a956f1fa-832c-405e-ac5a-8b8aca6e1ea0
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Burridge, Jane
7c453775-c3ae-4d55-99af-2ed8600ca680
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72

(2010) Stroke Rehabilitation using Learning Control Mediated by Electrical Stimulation. Southampton Neuroscience Group. (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Many people have problems with using their arm after a stroke, which can affect their ability to perform activities like reaching out to pick an object up. Over the last few years new technologies which use robots and electrical stimulation (ES) of muscles have been used to help with these problems. We have developed a new system which employs both of these technologies in conjunction with a technique called “Iterative Learning Control” (ILC) to help people recover movement in their arm. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ILC mediated by ES is a plausible intervention in upper limb stroke rehabilitation. Five hemiparetic participants with reduced upper limb function were asked to move their arm to track a slowing moving dot of light. This was for planar motion, replicating reaching out to an object across a table top. The participants’ arm was supported by the robot and ES was applied to the triceps brachii muscle. During each training task, the same tracking movement was repeated 6 times. After each repetition, ILC was used to compute the amount of stimulation (amplitude and timing) to be applied to the muscle on the next trial by incorporating data from previous trials of the task. Participants undertook 18 or 25, 1hour treatment sessions composed of training tasks varying in length, orientation and speed. Unassisted tracking (no ES supplied) was undertaken pre and post each treatment session. The Action Research Arm Test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) test were administered pre and post all treatment sessions. Significant improvements were found in 3 of 4 unassisted tracking tasks. FMA results also showed an improvement (although this was not clinically relevant). Thus, this study has shown feasibility in using ILC mediated ES for upper limb rehabilitation.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: September 2010
Additional Information: Event Dates: 23 September 2010
Venue - Dates: Southampton Neuroscience Group, 2010-09-23
Organisations: EEE, Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 271586
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/271586
PURE UUID: 983a184b-2cfa-4918-9561-94d5569e20c5
ORCID for Katie L. Meadmore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5378-8370
ORCID for Anne-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Eric Rogers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0179-9398

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Sep 2010 18:09
Last modified: 14 Jun 2019 00:40

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