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The atmospheric response to a thermohaline circulation collapse: scaling relations for the Hadley circulation and the response in a coupled climate model

The atmospheric response to a thermohaline circulation collapse: scaling relations for the Hadley circulation and the response in a coupled climate model
The atmospheric response to a thermohaline circulation collapse: scaling relations for the Hadley circulation and the response in a coupled climate model
The response of the tropical atmosphere to a collapse of the thermohaline circulation (THC) is investigated by comparing two 5-member ensemble runs with a coupled climate model (CCM), the difference being that in one ensemble a hosing experiment was performed. An extension of the Held–Hou–Lindzen model for the Hadley circulation is developed to interpret the results. The forcing associated with a THC collapse is qualitatively similar to, but smaller in amplitude than, the solstitial shift from boreal summer to winter. This forcing results from reduced ocean heat transport creating an anomalous cross-equatorial SST gradient. The small amplitude of the forcing makes it possible to arrive at analytical expressions using standard perturbation theory. The theory predicts the latitudinal shift between the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) Hadley cells, and the relative strength of the anomalous cross-equatorial Hadley cell compared to the solstitial cell. The poleward extent of the Hadley cells is controlled by other physics. In the NH the Hadley cell contracts, while zonal velocities increase and the subtropical jet shifts equatorward, whereas in the SH cell the opposite occurs. This behavior can be explained by assuming that the poleward extent of the Hadley cell is determined by baroclinic instability: it scales with the inverse of the isentropic slopes. Both theory and CCM results indicate that a THC collapse and changes in tropical circulation do not act in competition, as a possible explanation for abrupt climate change; they act in concert.

0894-8755
757-774
Drijfhout, Sybren S.
a5c76079-179b-490c-93fe-fc0391aacf13
Drijfhout, Sybren S.
a5c76079-179b-490c-93fe-fc0391aacf13

Drijfhout, Sybren S. (2010) The atmospheric response to a thermohaline circulation collapse: scaling relations for the Hadley circulation and the response in a coupled climate model. Journal of Climate, 23 (3), 757-774. (doi:10.1175/2009JCLI3159.1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The response of the tropical atmosphere to a collapse of the thermohaline circulation (THC) is investigated by comparing two 5-member ensemble runs with a coupled climate model (CCM), the difference being that in one ensemble a hosing experiment was performed. An extension of the Held–Hou–Lindzen model for the Hadley circulation is developed to interpret the results. The forcing associated with a THC collapse is qualitatively similar to, but smaller in amplitude than, the solstitial shift from boreal summer to winter. This forcing results from reduced ocean heat transport creating an anomalous cross-equatorial SST gradient. The small amplitude of the forcing makes it possible to arrive at analytical expressions using standard perturbation theory. The theory predicts the latitudinal shift between the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) Hadley cells, and the relative strength of the anomalous cross-equatorial Hadley cell compared to the solstitial cell. The poleward extent of the Hadley cells is controlled by other physics. In the NH the Hadley cell contracts, while zonal velocities increase and the subtropical jet shifts equatorward, whereas in the SH cell the opposite occurs. This behavior can be explained by assuming that the poleward extent of the Hadley cell is determined by baroclinic instability: it scales with the inverse of the isentropic slopes. Both theory and CCM results indicate that a THC collapse and changes in tropical circulation do not act in competition, as a possible explanation for abrupt climate change; they act in concert.

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Published date: 2010
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

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Local EPrints ID: 340330
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/340330
ISSN: 0894-8755
PURE UUID: 2bbd19ab-69b7-40f7-a940-0002d7fb0537

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Date deposited: 18 Jun 2012 15:42
Last modified: 30 Sep 2019 19:07

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