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Does the Internet ‘absorb’ human subjectivity and sociality? The limitations of two current dynamic process models to answer this question

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Some recent social theories have argued that human activities are immersed in 'flows' rather than social structures as traditionally conceived. Flows may both facilitate social order in complex globalised life or threaten it. The Internet and its associated technologies have been seen as (1) part of the mechanism that produces flow characteristics in communication processes, and (2) a threat to human subjectivity and sociality when viewed as a mechanism of flow. This paper reviews the social theoretical background of agency frameworks that have contributed to work on 'socionics' and 'social robotics'. Between the original formulations of an agenda to interconnect the sociology of human agency with the Internet and recent imaginative empirical research designs examining the connection of human bodies with machines, it is argued that our conceptual frameworks of agency have not succeeded in openning up the 'hot zone' where human-body-ICT interaction can be understood to flow, or experience 'absorption'. Instead, the hot zone reproduces traditional views of agency that pose a boundary between embodied and reflective actions.

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Citation

Vass, J. (2012) Does the Internet ‘absorb’ human subjectivity and sociality? The limitations of two current dynamic process models to answer this question At World Wide Web 2012, France. 16 - 20 Apr 2012. 5 pp.

More information

Published date: January 2012
Venue - Dates: World Wide Web 2012, France, 2012-04-16 - 2012-04-20
Organisations: Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 340695
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/340695
PURE UUID: 8f9bf211-592a-49e7-acfc-cb155f4a2cc0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jul 2012 12:45
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:42

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Contributors

Author: J. Vass

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