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Determination of long chain fatty acids in anaerobic digesters using a rapid non-derivatisation GC-FID method

Determination of long chain fatty acids in anaerobic digesters using a rapid non-derivatisation GC-FID method
Determination of long chain fatty acids in anaerobic digesters using a rapid non-derivatisation GC-FID method
A rapid non-derivatisation gas chromatographic (GC) method for quantification of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids was achieved using a flame ionisation detector and a highly polar capillary column at elevated temperature. These long chain fatty acids (LCFA) can accumulate in anaerobic digesters and a simple extraction method was also developed to permit a more rapid sample turn-around time, facilitating more frequent monitoring. The GC method was satisfactory in terms of peak separation, signal response, reproducibility and linearity range. The extraction method achieved recoveries of 103.8, 127.2 and 84.2% for palmitic, stearic and oleic acid respectively. The method was tested on digestate from mesophilic laboratory-scale digesters fed with source-segregated domestic food waste, and showed good repeatability between replicate samples. It was observed that the concentrations of stearic and palmitic acid in digesters routinely supplemented with trace elements were lower in proportion to the applied lipid loading than those without supplementation
0273-1223
741-747
Jiang, Ying
e6e39ee2-e0a6-4e60-9604-ce363c7ce5f9
Zhang, Yue
69b11d32-d555-46e4-a333-88eee4628ae7
Banks, C.J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Jiang, Ying
e6e39ee2-e0a6-4e60-9604-ce363c7ce5f9
Zhang, Yue
69b11d32-d555-46e4-a333-88eee4628ae7
Banks, C.J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f

Jiang, Ying, Zhang, Yue and Banks, C.J. (2012) Determination of long chain fatty acids in anaerobic digesters using a rapid non-derivatisation GC-FID method. Water Science & Technology, 66 (4), 741-747. (doi:10.2166/wst.2012.063).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A rapid non-derivatisation gas chromatographic (GC) method for quantification of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids was achieved using a flame ionisation detector and a highly polar capillary column at elevated temperature. These long chain fatty acids (LCFA) can accumulate in anaerobic digesters and a simple extraction method was also developed to permit a more rapid sample turn-around time, facilitating more frequent monitoring. The GC method was satisfactory in terms of peak separation, signal response, reproducibility and linearity range. The extraction method achieved recoveries of 103.8, 127.2 and 84.2% for palmitic, stearic and oleic acid respectively. The method was tested on digestate from mesophilic laboratory-scale digesters fed with source-segregated domestic food waste, and showed good repeatability between replicate samples. It was observed that the concentrations of stearic and palmitic acid in digesters routinely supplemented with trace elements were lower in proportion to the applied lipid loading than those without supplementation

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Published date: 2012
Organisations: Water & Environmental Engineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347496
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347496
ISSN: 0273-1223
PURE UUID: 689fb6a8-de64-4e18-aeb6-7996da074dcd
ORCID for Yue Zhang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5068-2260

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2013 14:26
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:02

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Contributors

Author: Ying Jiang
Author: Yue Zhang ORCID iD
Author: C.J. Banks

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