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Endgame optimisation

Endgame optimisation
Endgame optimisation
Within the defence industry, there is the need to provide an improvement in the efficiency (performance) of a missile system. The present generation of missile systems are sub-optimal in many currently considered scenarios. Scenarios include both anti-air and ground attack domains and these have to allow for an increased usage of stealth, more effective countermeasures, and better mission survivability by making use of redundancy in subsystems. There are many methods by which this improvement in efficiency can be achieved The traditional approach to improving the lethality of a missile has been to concentrate efforts in the guidance and control systems to improve accuracy and agility.

This thesis considers how optimizing the endgame, the final few milliseconds before detonation, can yield improvements in overall lethality. This is achieved using traditional optimisation techniques and has investigated possible missile warhead fusing strategies which may be used in order to provide robust, high lethality engagement conditions for an air-to-air missile system. The development of various fusing strategies has been performed based on observations made during the undertaking of this research. This included development of fusing rules used for the missile warhead and the development of advanced fusing algorithms that look at past missile fly-out and lethality data to aid the decision process of when to fuse the missile.
Patel, N.
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Patel, N.
1cd9d48d-dc57-445a-bb7d-e70edd515932
Chipperfield, Andrew
524269cd-5f30-4356-92d4-891c14c09340
Keane, Andrew
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Patel, N. (2008) Endgame optimisation. University of Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Masters Thesis, 191pp.

Record type: Thesis (Masters)

Abstract

Within the defence industry, there is the need to provide an improvement in the efficiency (performance) of a missile system. The present generation of missile systems are sub-optimal in many currently considered scenarios. Scenarios include both anti-air and ground attack domains and these have to allow for an increased usage of stealth, more effective countermeasures, and better mission survivability by making use of redundancy in subsystems. There are many methods by which this improvement in efficiency can be achieved The traditional approach to improving the lethality of a missile has been to concentrate efforts in the guidance and control systems to improve accuracy and agility.

This thesis considers how optimizing the endgame, the final few milliseconds before detonation, can yield improvements in overall lethality. This is achieved using traditional optimisation techniques and has investigated possible missile warhead fusing strategies which may be used in order to provide robust, high lethality engagement conditions for an air-to-air missile system. The development of various fusing strategies has been performed based on observations made during the undertaking of this research. This included development of fusing rules used for the missile warhead and the development of advanced fusing algorithms that look at past missile fly-out and lethality data to aid the decision process of when to fuse the missile.

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More information

Published date: December 2008
Organisations: University of Southampton, Civil Maritime & Env. Eng & Sci Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348999
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348999
PURE UUID: 9c3e4e13-7470-4a90-a057-697f6212aa75
ORCID for Andrew Chipperfield: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3026-9890

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Mar 2013 13:50
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:46

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Contributors

Author: N. Patel
Thesis advisor: Andrew Chipperfield ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Andrew Keane

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