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Hydrodynamic object recognition using pressure sensing

Hydrodynamic object recognition using pressure sensing
Hydrodynamic object recognition using pressure sensing
Hydrodynamic sensing is instrumental to fish and some amphibians. It also represents, for underwater vehicles, an alternative way of sensing the fluid environment when visual and acoustic sensing are limited. To assess the effectiveness of hydrodynamic sensing and gain insight into its capabilities and limitations, we investigated the forward and inverse problem of detection and identification, using the hydrodynamic pressure in the neighbourhood, of a stationary obstacle described using a general shape representation. Based on conformal mapping and a general normalization procedure, our obstacle representation accounts for all specific features of progressive perceptual hydrodynamic imaging reported experimentally. Size, location and shape are encoded separately. The shape representation rests upon an asymptotic series which embodies the progressive character of hydrodynamic imaging through pressure sensing. A dynamic filtering method is used to invert noisy nonlinear pressure signals for the shape parameters. The results highlight the dependence of the sensitivity of hydrodynamic sensing not only on the relative distance to the disturbance but also its bearing.
hydrodynamic mapping, pressure sensing, object detection and recognition
1364-5021
19-38
Bouffanais, Roland
e9424ce7-67a3-4ab2-9796-feca73bac115
Weymouth, Gabriel D.
b0c85fda-dfed-44da-8cc4-9e0cc88e2ca0
Yue, Dick K.P.
217a3958-645d-496c-970a-73c9d0d22499
Bouffanais, Roland
e9424ce7-67a3-4ab2-9796-feca73bac115
Weymouth, Gabriel D.
b0c85fda-dfed-44da-8cc4-9e0cc88e2ca0
Yue, Dick K.P.
217a3958-645d-496c-970a-73c9d0d22499

Bouffanais, Roland, Weymouth, Gabriel D. and Yue, Dick K.P. (2010) Hydrodynamic object recognition using pressure sensing. Proceedings of the Royal Society A, 467 (2125), 19-38. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2010.0095).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Hydrodynamic sensing is instrumental to fish and some amphibians. It also represents, for underwater vehicles, an alternative way of sensing the fluid environment when visual and acoustic sensing are limited. To assess the effectiveness of hydrodynamic sensing and gain insight into its capabilities and limitations, we investigated the forward and inverse problem of detection and identification, using the hydrodynamic pressure in the neighbourhood, of a stationary obstacle described using a general shape representation. Based on conformal mapping and a general normalization procedure, our obstacle representation accounts for all specific features of progressive perceptual hydrodynamic imaging reported experimentally. Size, location and shape are encoded separately. The shape representation rests upon an asymptotic series which embodies the progressive character of hydrodynamic imaging through pressure sensing. A dynamic filtering method is used to invert noisy nonlinear pressure signals for the shape parameters. The results highlight the dependence of the sensitivity of hydrodynamic sensing not only on the relative distance to the disturbance but also its bearing.

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More information

Published date: 2010
Keywords: hydrodynamic mapping, pressure sensing, object detection and recognition
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349798
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349798
ISSN: 1364-5021
PURE UUID: 16553e80-316e-4399-bd78-35c47b08d082
ORCID for Gabriel D. Weymouth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5080-5016

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Date deposited: 11 Mar 2013 13:33
Last modified: 01 Oct 2019 00:36

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